CIT Conference Proceedings

1994 CIT Conference Proceedings – Download PDF

Proceedings of the 10th Convention of
Conference of Interpreter Trainers

1994: Mapping Our Course: A Collaborative Venture

Elizabeth A.Winston, Editor | Charlotte, North Carolina

Table of Contents

PART 1

  • CASTLES IN THE AIR- ¬†EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS COMMITTEE ¬†Cathy Cogen, Co-Chair¬†
  • SETTING STANDARDS-KEYNOTE PRESENTATION,CIT 1994¬†Martha O’Connor, Ph.D., OTRlL¬†
  • POSITION PAPER: INSTRUCTIONAL CLASS SIZE – CONFERENCE OF INTERPRETER TRAINERS
  • POSITION PAPER: COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE – CONFERENCE OF INTERPRETER TRAINERS
  • COMPREHENSIVE ISSUE: LEVELS OF EDUCATION – ¬†ISSUE PAPER: DIFFERENTIATING TRAINING FROM EDUCATION, TECHNICAL FROM PROFESSIONAL –Nancy Frishberg & Sherman Wilcox¬†
  • ISSUE I: FACULTY QUALIFICATIONS – ISSUE PAPER: WHAT CONSTITUTES A QUALITY FACULTY IN INTERPRETER EDUCATION –¬†Elizabeth A. Winston¬†
  • RESPONSE –WHAT CONSTITUTES A QUALITY FACULTY? – RESPONSE PAPER: ROLE OF DEAF FACULTY IN AN INTERPRETING TRAINING PROGRAM –¬†Val Dively¬†
  • ISSUE II: DIVERSITY IN INTERPRETING EDUCATION – ISSUE PAPER: DIVERSITY IN INTERPRETER EDUCATION ¬†–¬†Pat Stawasz¬†
  • RESPONSE — DIVERSITY
  • RESPONSE — PROFICIENCY ¬†– RESPONSE PAPER: PROFICIENCY¬†Nancy Schweda
  • APPENDIX I — PROFICIENCY- STUDENT COMPETENCIES IN INTERPRETING: DEFINING, TEACHING AND EVALUATING –¬†Roda P. Roberts¬†
  • ISSUE IV: ENTRY LEVEL TO THE PROFESSION¬†–¬†No Author¬†
  • RESPONSE — ENTRY LEVEL TO THE PROFESSION –¬†RESPONSE PAPER # I : THE “READINESS-TO-WORK GAP”¬†Carol J. Patrie¬†
  • RESPONSE — ENTRY LEVEL TO THE PROFESSION¬†–¬†RESPONSE PAPER #2: A RESPONSE TOTHE “READINESS-TO-WORK GAP”¬†Linda Stauffer
  • RESPONSE — ENTRY LEVEL TO THE PROFESSION¬†–¬†RESPONSE PAPER #3: START WITH THE END IN MIND¬†Rebecca Robinson ¬†
  • RESPONSE — ENTRY LEVEL TO THE PROFESSION¬†–¬†RESPONSE PAPER #4: INTERNSHIP, PRACTICUM, FIELDWORK, MENTORING¬†Nancy Frishberg¬†
  • APPENDIX I — ENTRY LEVEL TO THE PROFESSION – ISSUES IN THE ANALYSIS OF CHANGE IN HIGHER EDUCATION ASSESSMENT¬†Marcia Mentkowski¬†

PART II

  • ASSESSING SECOND LANGUAGE LEVELS OF INTERPRETERS¬†ChristineMonikowskiPhD
  • ENGLISH TO ASL TRANSLATION: TEACHING TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS¬†Val Dively¬†
  • ASSESSING ENGLISH TO ASL INTERPRETATIONS IN AN OBJECTIVE MANNER¬†Marty M. Taylor, Ph.D.¬†
  • MENTORSHIP: A TRUE COURSE IN COLLABORATION – THE RITC REGION IX MENTORSHIP PROGRAM¬†Tracy Schneider Clark¬†
  • EFFECTIVE SCREENING PROCEDURES FOR ENTERING STUDENTS IN INTERPRETER EDUCATION¬†Jan Humphrey¬†
  • A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO DIFFERENT KINDS OF INTERPRETING¬†Dr. Sue Livingston, Bonnie Singer, & Dr. Theodore Abramson¬†
  • INTERPRETER DISCOURSE: ENGLISH TO ASL¬†EXPANSION –¬†Shelley Lawrence¬†
  • DIALOGUE VIDEOJOURNALS: CONNECTING TEACHER & STUDENT THROUGH INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION¬†Eve Adelman West¬†
  • THE PORTRAYAL OF SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS IN THE MEDIA¬†Linda A. Siple¬†
  • RID CERTIFICATION MAINTENANCE ¬†Ray James, M Ed., IClTC¬†
  • A CONVERSATION: WRITTEN FEEDBACK WHILE TEAM INTERPRETING¬†Risa Shaw¬†

PROGRAM  NOTES

  • APPLYING HIGHER ORDER THINKING SKILLS AND¬†COOPERATIVE EDUCATION TO INTERPRETER EDUCATION¬†¬†Jan Humphrey¬†
  • RESPONSIBILITIES OF EDUCATIONAL SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS IN K-12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN KANSAS, MISSOURI AND NEBRASKA¬†Bernhardt E. Jones, Ed. D., C. S. C.

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