Call for Manuscripts

Rolling Deadline

Rolling deadline: Articles placed in volumes on completion of review process

The International Journal of Interpreter Education, published by the Conference of Interpreter Trainers, is a refereed journal that specializes in the education of spoken and signed language interpreters for the purpose of promoting dialogue through evidence and practice-based research.

We are now looking for submissions for future volumes (2 per year).

Content Sought

Content includes:

Interpreter Education and Training

History of the profession
World perspectives, philosophies and practices
Curriculum
Lesson plans and activities
Learning environments
Student psychological and social factors
Testing, assessment and evaluation

Second Language Learning

Second language acquisition theory and models
Curriculum
Language and culture
Language activities
Team teaching
Testing, assessment and evaluation

Interpreting Practice

Education to practice gap
Internships and mentoring
Teaching ethical decision making
Testing, assessment and evaluation

Programming and Administration

Program administration and institutional issues
Program philosophy and design
Faculty
Accreditation
Student entry and exit competencies
Language Labs
Generalist and specialist education
Program Assessment
Distance education

Interpreting Research

Findings of interpreter research
Research frameworks and disciplines
Theory to practice
Teaching research

Educational Theory

Adult education
Educational models

Journal Sections

We are now looking for submissions for future volumes (2 per year) for all of the following sections:

  • Research Articles
    Theoretical evidence-based articles that present findings from research on, or related to, interpreter education and training .
  • Commentary
    Practice-based presentations of reflections on educational practices and teaching activities that provide meaningful advancements in the processes of preparing future interpreters; maintaining the skills of current interpreters, or promoting the professional development of practicing interpreter educators. In this section we also welcome original reviews of books or curriculae that may be of interest to interpreter educators and trainers.
  • Open Forum
    Publishable interviews with leading scholars, transcripts of debates or presentations of case studies that extend our understanding and analyses of trends in interpreter education and training.
  • Student work section
    Featuring the work of aspiring interpreter education scholars—graduate students who have completed research projects related to interpreter education, who are experienced interpreter educators but may not have the experience of writing for publication—this section specifically encourages interpreter educators who are studying in Masters or PhD programs to share their work with alongside established scholars in the field.
  • Dissertation Abstracts
    Abstracts of Masters or PhD dissertations related to interpreter education.
Submissions

Submissions

See Notes for Authors (below) for specific requirements on submitting a manuscript for publication consideration. Manuscripts that do not conform to submission requirements will be returned to authors.

If you have any questions, contact the Editor at CITjournaleditor@gmail.com

Notes for Authors

Editorial Policy

1. Editorial Policy

The International Journal of Interpreter Education (IJIE)is an international peer-reviewed journal covering topics of interest to all those researching and working in interpreter education and training.

The Editors welcome material on any aspect of interpreter education research, theory, policy, application, or practice that will advance thinking in the field. IJIE addresses issues of current and future concern to interpreter educators, encouraging interdisciplinary discussion.

IJIE seeks to achieve a better understanding of the principles that underpin the effective development and delivery of interpreter education. It seeks to understand how policy and practice in the area can be built on sound theoretical or heuristic foundations to achieve a greater impact on educational outcomes and practical application.

Research articles based on empirical or action research are welcomed. We also seek submissions that discuss effective teaching practices, and opinion pieces that highlight trends and debates in the interpreter education field.
IJIE features the following sections:

Research Articles
Theoretical evidence-based articles that present findings from research on interpreter education and training. Articles should be 5,000–6,000 words in length (including notes and references). All manuscripts submitted for publication in the Research Articles section will be double-blind peer reviewed.

Commentary
Practice-based presentations of reflections on educational practices and teaching activities that provide meaningful advancements in the processes of preparing future interpreters, maintaining the skills of current interpreters, or promoting the professional development of practicing interpreter educators. In this section we also welcome original reviews of books, curriculae, or resources that may be of interest to interpreter educators and trainers. Submissions should be 2,000–3,000 words in length. All manuscripts submitted for publication in the Commentary section will be reviewed by one Editorial Board member.

Open Forum
The editors invite publishable interviews with leading scholars, transcripts of debates, or presentations of case studies that extend our understanding and analyses of trends in interpreter education and training. All manuscripts submitted for publication in the Open Forum section will be reviewed by one Editorial Board member.

Dissertation abstracts
If you have recently completed your dissertation (or know of someone else who has) on a topic related to interpreter education, please submit information to the Editor including: name of PhD candidate, title of PhD thesis, Department and University of PhD award,  150–200 word abstract, and contact address and email  for further inquiries.

Papers should be submitted by e-mail attachment to the Editor (see Manuscript Preparation).

Correspondence to: Jemina Napier – Editor

E-mail: CITjournaleditor@gmail.com

Topic Coverage

2. Topic coverage

Material on all aspects of interpreter education will be considered for publication including:

Interpreter Education and Training

  • History of the profession
  • World perspectives, philosophies and practices
  • Curriculum
  • Lesson plans and activities
  • Learning environments
  • Student psychological and social factors
  • Testing, assessment and evaluation

Second Language Learning

  • Second language acquisition theory and models
  • Curriculum
  • Language and culture
  • Language activities
  • Team teaching
  • Testing, assessment and evaluation

Interpreting Practice

  • Education to practice gap
  • Internships and mentoring
  • Teaching ethical decision making
  • Testing, assessment and evaluation
Programming and Administration

  • Program administration and institutional issues
  • Program philosophy and design
  • Faculty
  • Accreditation
  • Student entry and exit competencies
  • Language Labs
  • Generalist and specialist education
  • Program assessment
  • Distance education

Interpreting Research

  • Findings of interpreter research
  • Research frameworks and disciplines
  • Theory to practice
  • Teaching research


Educational Theory

  • Adult education
  • Educational models

Originality and Copyright

3. Originality and Copyright

Submission of a manuscript is understood to imply that the work is original, unpublished, and is not being considered for publication elsewhere.

The author will be responsible for obtaining copyright clearance of any material abstracted from other sources. The source of such material must be acknowledged in the text.

Refereeing

4. Refereeing

For Research articles, in the first round of reviewing the journal adheres to a rigorous double-blind reviewing policy for all manuscripts submitted, in which the identity of both the reviewer and author are concealed from both parties unless this proves impossible because of extensive self-citation or other identifying features in the text.

Editorial Review Process: All manuscripts are reviewed initially by the Editor and only those papers that meet the scientific and editorial standards of the journal, and fit within the aims and scope of the journal, will be sent for review.

Peer-Review Process: Each Research Article manuscript is reviewed by at least two referees. Opinion pieces submitted for the Commentary section will be reviewed by one Editorial Board member.

All manuscripts are reviewed as rapidly as possible, with reviewers asked to provide responses within 4 weeks. An editorial decision is generally reached within 6 weeks of submission unless the paper is highly specialized, in which case longer may be required to find reviewers who are prepared to contribute.

Ensuring a Blind Peer Review

To ensure the integrity of the blind peer-review for submission to this journal, every effort should be made to prevent the identities of the authors and reviewers from being known to each other. This involves the authors, editors, and reviewers (who upload documents as part of their review) checking to see if the following steps have been taken with regard to the text and the file properties:

  1. The authors of the document have deleted their names from the text, with “Author” and year used in the references and footnotes, instead of the authors’ name, article title, etc.

  2. With Microsoft Office documents, author identification should also be removed from the properties for the file (see under File in Word), by clicking on the following, beginning with File on the main menu of the Microsoft application: File > Save As > Tools (or Options with a Mac) > Security > Remove personal information from file properties on save > Save.

Manuscript Preparation

5. Manuscript Preparation

  • All authors must submit their manuscripts using the IJIE Microsoft Word Manuscript Template – available HERE. The template has the IJIE style embedded within the headings, paragraphs, etc., and conforms to APA style (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition). This template helps the author prepare the manuscript in a format that looks best on the printed page and speeds up the refereeing and publication process. Manuscripts not conforming to the IJIE style will be returned to the author.

  • At present1, contributions must be in English, using consistent American English spelling conventions.

  • The average length of Research Articles is 5000 – 6000 words. Commentary and Open Forum submissions should be no more than 3,000 words.

  • Diagrams need to be of a quality suitable for high resolution printing at 600-1200dpi preferably in grey scale. If color is essential, then it can only appear in color in the electronic version.

  • All diagrams should be captioned “Figure X: Title” and referred to by number in the text. Tables should also be captioned “Table X: Title”. Both should be positioned in the text where the author feels is appropriate but the Editor reserves the right to re-organize the layout to suit the printing process.

  • To aid readability and usability, extensive appendix material should normally be avoided unless it is essential to the understanding of the article. As the article will be available electronically, appendix material can be referenced online rather than being reproduced in full.

Typing/ Writing Style

Please refer to the IJIE Microsoft Word Manuscript Template. Style guidelines are as follows:

  1. Justify text.
  2. Use 1.5 line spacing and 10 point font.
  3. Indent the first line of every following paragraph after the first paragraph, typing the remaining lines of the paragraph to the uniform left hand margin.
  4. Leave uniform margins of at least 3cm at the top, bottom, right and left of every page.
  5. The cover page should include the title of the paper; names of authors and institutional affiliations; contact details for lead author for correspondence; a 150-200 word abstract; suggested short running head; and 6 keywords. The first page of the paper should have only the title of the article and no other author identification.
  6. Put the page number on every page (beginning from the first page of the article).
  7. Avoid unnecessary jargon and explain any technical terms you use.
  8. If discussing examples of signed-spoken language interpreting, do not assume that everyone understands American Sign Language (ASL) or the language pairs that you are discussing, so provide clear explanations/glossing of the signs used. For example ‘the sign for HEARING in Auslan (ASL ‘D’ handshape moving from ear to chin); or by inserting pictorial/ photographic representation as seen below.
  9. The journal editors encourage the use of video clips for exemplification of data wherever possible. Thus you may provide video clips that can be included in the online version of the journal. Contact webmaster@cit-asl.org to discuss video format options.

Auslan example

Spelling and style of common words/terms

As detailed in the first editorial in IJIE Volume 1 (Napier, 2009, pp.3-4), the journal has a policy with regards to using the convention ‘D/deaf’:

“Many readers will be familiar with the fact that in deaf/signed language linguistics and interpreting literature the “D/d” convention is used to distinguish between members who use the signed language of a linguistic and cultural minority community (Deaf) and those who have a hearing loss but do not use sign language or identify themselves with this linguistic minority (deaf)… Given the evolving nature of the deaf community due to medical advancements and changes in educational policy, greater numbers of deaf people come to the community as late learners of signed language. Thus, definitions of deaf community membership are changing. In order to be inclusive rather than exclusive, the focus of this journal will be on the languages used and interpreting as social practice with empowered and disempowered communities in both conference and community contexts. No judgment is made about the hearing and linguistic identity or status of people who use a signed language. If articles are submitted that refer to deaf people or the deaf community, all references to deafness will be edited so as not to distinguish between Deaf/deaf.”

Another convention is to refer to ‘signed language interpreter/interpreting’, rather than ‘‘sign language interpreter/interpreting’ when referring to the modality, but references to named signed languages (such as British Sign Language, American Sign Language) should retain the term ‘Sign’. Capitalization is only to be used when referring to a named sign language (i.e., not Signed Language Interpreting).

Furthermore, there are other commonly used words that should be spelled as follows:

  • fingerspell
  • health care
  • lipread
  • speechread
  • E.U. (n.)
  • U.S. (n.)

Spelling and punctuation of common abbreviations

With the exception of the term et al., each of the following standard abbreviations are only used in text within parentheses, with careful notation of the punctuation used.Within the general text, use the full English form. The abbreviation et al. (from the Latin ‘et alia’) may be used in parentheses or in the general text. The accepted forms of abbreviation are as follows:
et al.               and others                                                    i.e.,                  that is
e.g.,                for example                                                   viz.,                  namely
etc.                  and so forth                                                  cf.                    compare
&                     and

Guidelines for Commentary Section Reviewers

Guidelines for Commentary Section Reviewers

The International Journal of Interpreter Education (IJIE) is an international peer-reviewed journal covering topics of interest to all those researching and working in interpreter education and training.

Reviews submitted to IJIE should be written in English but the books, curriculae or resources reviewed may be in any language. A review should not exceed 3,000 words in length and should consist of a detailed overview of the publication in question, followed by a critical assessment and an attempt to compare it with similar publications on the market/ curriculae or resources in the field.

Books: Reviewers should detail why the book may be of interest to spoken and signed language interpreter educators, and other interested parties, such as translator educators, interpreter and translator practitioners, language teachers, etc.

Curriculae/resources: Reviewers should detail why the curriculum/resource under review is effective, how it can be applied in other contexts, or how it could be improved.

In the first instance, you will need to send an electronic copy of your review to CITrevieweditor@gmail.com. If the review is accepted for publication, we will ask you to check the final version before submission to the printer.

Review Preparation

  • All authors must submit their manuscripts using the IJIE Microsoft Word Manuscript Template.  The template has the IJIE style embedded within the headings, paragraphs, etc., and conforms to APA style (American Psychological Association). This template helps the author prepare the manuscript in a format that looks best on the printed page and speeds up the refereeing and publication process. Manuscripts not conforming to the IJIE style will be returned to the author.

  • At present, contributions must be in English, using consistent American English spelling conventions. (Consideration is being given to the future possibility of submissions being allowed in one or more signed languages.)

  • The average length of a Review submission is 2,000-3,000 words.

  • Refer to the Notes for Authors for full details of writing style, referencing, etc

Manuscript Template

This manuscript template is in Microsoft Word format and must be used for submissions.

Download the Template.

(PC users – right click and choose “Save Target as..” Mac users – CTRL – click and choose “Download Link Target…”)

The template should look like the image below:

Manuscript Submission Template

Referencing

6. Referencing

All publications cited in the text must be presented in a list of references following the text of the manuscript in a standard format. IJIE is guided by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition, commonly known as ‘APA style’. The references must be cited using APA style and listed alphabetically (see http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/DocAPA.html for an overview of APA style). Non-compliant manuscripts will be returned to the author for correction.

Citations in the text

  • Include only the surname(s) of the author(s) and the date of publication of the article or book. For example:

    In a recent study (Aguado-Giménez & Pérez-Paredes, 2005), it was found that…

or

In a recent study by Aguado-Giménez and Pérez-Paredes (2005) it was found that….

  • (b) When an article or book has from three to five authors and you are citing it several times, give all the names in the first citation. For example:

    In their survey of community interpreters, Chesher, Slatyer, Doubine, Jaric, and Lazzari (2003) found that…

or

A survey of community interpreters (Chesher, Slatyer, Doubine, Jaric, & Lazzari, 2003) found that…

and from then on give the name of the first author followed by “et al.”. For example:

Furthermore, Chesher, et al. (2003) state that the majority of community interpreters…

or

The most notable survey of community interpreters (Chesher, et al., 2003) has shown…

  • When an article or book has six or more authors, the convention described in (b) above can be used for the first and all subsequent citations.
  • When referring to a chapter from an edited book (where each chapter is written by a different author), give the surname(s) of the author(s) who wrote the chapter, not of the editor(s) who collated and published them.
  • If there is an unavoidable need to cite work from a source (secondary reference) that has not been directly accessed write “Jones (1968, cited in Brown, 1986)…”. In the list of references include only Brown (1986) since this is the only reference that was accessed.

Quotations in the text

  • For a direct quotation, include the page number of the quotation. For example:

    In her discussion of international interpretation research collaboration, Shaw stated that the study was conducted “for the purpose of increasing the contribution to empirical and theoretical research related to students transitioning from language learning to interpretation” (2006, p.441).

or:

International interpretation research collaboration is important “for the purpose of increasing the contribution to empirical and theoretical research related to students transitioning from language learning to interpretation” (Shaw, 2006, p.441).

  • Incorporate any short quotations (fewer than 40 words) into the body of the text and enclose the quotation with double quotation marks. For example:

    In this way students can “have some control over their own learning…make choices about their own learning” (Small & Lankes, 1996, p.103), and strive to gain…

  • If you do not use the entire quote, use ellipsis (…) between parts of the sentence (as shown above). If you need to insert a word so that it makes sense, place between square brackets. Display a quotation of more than 40 words in a free standing block without quotations marks, single spaced and justified on the left and right. Avoid using such lengthy quotes unless absolutely necessary. Start such a block quotation on a new line, indent it 5 spaces from the left and right margin. For example:

    In his later analyses, Davis (2003) found that:

    the forms of cross-linguistic transfer evident in bilingual discourse (namely code-switching, code-mixing and lexical borrowing) are also characteristic features of ASL interpretation… [interpreters] utilize both oral and visual-gestural channels of communication and alternate between using ASL and English mouth movements (p.118).

  • Ordinarily footnotes should not be used. Under most circumstances, information should be included in the body of the document. If footnotes are necessary, ensure that they are brief and provide specifically relevant information.

Reference list

  • All written papers will require a reference list. Start the reference list on a new page headed ‘References’. Each reference should commence on a new line with the second line indented (one tab setting).
  • All citations in the text should appear in the reference list. Include the names of all authors (i.e., do not use “et al.”). Do not include books or articles that you have not referred to in the paper. The list should be in alphabetical order of first authors’ surnames. Pay close attention to punctuation used. If including two or more references by the same first author, use the second author’s name to determine order. If including more than one reference by the same author(s) then list in chronological order. If including more than one reference by the same author published in the same year then use (a, b, c.) to delineate between publications. For example:

Napier, J. (2002a).

Napier, J. (2002b).

Napier, J. (2004).

Napier, J., McKee, R., and Goswell, D. (2006).

Napier, J., & Rohan, M. (2007).

  • Books: List in the following order – name of author(s), initials, year of publication (in brackets), title of book (italicised, and in lower case except for initial letter of first word, initial of first word after a colon, and proper nouns), place of publication and name of publisher. For example:

Christie, F. (2002). Classroom discourse analysis: A functional perspective. London: Continuum.

Napier, J., McKee, R., & Goswell, D. (2006). Sign language interpreting: Theory & practice in Australia and New Zealand. Sydney: Federation Press.

For a book with eight or more authors, include the first six authors and the final author following an ellipsis. (Do not use et al.) For example:

Gilbert, D. G., McClernon, J. F., Rabinovich, N. E.., Sugai, C., Plath, L. C., Asgaard, G., . . . Botros, N. (2004). Role play in American Sign Language. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

  • Journal articles: List details in the following order – name of author(s), initials, year of publication (in brackets), title of article (in lower case except for initial letter of first word, initial of first word after a colon, and proper nouns), title of the journal (italicised with initial letters capitalised), volume number of the journal (italicised), edition number in brackets, and pages occupied by the article. For example:

Lederer, M. (2007). Can theory help translator and interpreter trainers and trainees? The Interpreter & Translator Trainer, 1(1), 15-35.

Shaw, S. (2006). Launching international collaboration for interpretation research. Sign Language Studies, 6(4), 438-453.

For a journal article with eight or more authors, include the first six authors and the final author following an ellipsis. (Do not use et al.) For example:

Gilbert, D. G., McClernon, J. F., Rabinovich, N. E.., Sugai, C., Plath, L. C., Asgaard, G., . . . Botros, N. (2004). Role play in American Sign Language. Sign Language Journal, 8(4), 45-57.

  • Chapters in edited books: Provide (in this order) – name of author(s), initials, year of publication (in brackets), title of chapter (in lower case except for initial letter of first word, initial of first word after a colon, and proper nouns), then write “In”, then initials of editor(s) of the book, surname of editor(s), then “(Ed.)” or “(Eds.)”, then title of the book (italicised), pages occupied by the chapter (in brackets and preceded by “pp.”), place of publication and name of publisher. For example:

Metzger, M. (1999). Footing shifts in an interpreted mock interview. In E. Winston (Ed.), Storytelling and conversation: Discourse in Deaf communities (pp. 190-218). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

Winston, E. A. (2005). Designing a curriculum for American Sign Language/English interpreting educators. In M. Marschark, R. Peterson & E. A. Winston (Eds.), Interpreting and interpreting education: Directions for research and practice (pp. 208-234). New York: Oxford University Press.

  • Conference papers: If the paper appears in published proceedings, provide (in this order) – name of author(s), initials, year of publication (in brackets), title of paper (in lower case except for initial letter of first word, initial of first word after a colon, and proper nouns), then write “In”, then initials of editor(s) of the proceedings, surname of editor(s), then “(Ed.)” or “(Eds.)”, then title of the conference proceedings (italicised), pages occupied by the chapter (in brackets and preceded by “pp.”), , place and name of publisher. For example:

Davies, J. (1987). Team interpreting as an approach to the supervision of practicum students. In M. McIntire (Ed.), New dimensions in interpreter education: Curriculum and instruction: Proceedings of the 6th National Convention of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers (pp. 111-116). Chevy Chase, USA: RID Publications.

If the conference presentation is unpublished, , provide (in this order) – name of author(s), initials, year of publication and date of conference (in brackets), title of paper (in lower case except for initial letter of first word, initial of first word after a colon, and proper nouns), then ‘Paper presented at…’ followed by title of the conference (italicised), then place and date of conference. For example:

Flynn, J. (1996, 25 May). Reflections on sign language interpreting. Paper presented at the National Deafness Conference, Hobart, Australia.

  • Electronic references:Conference papers, policies, guidelines, and other online materials can be referenced as long as full retrievable information is provided. Authors should provide (in this order): name of author(s), initials, year of publication (in brackets), title of paper (in lower case except for initial letter of first word, initial of first word after a colon, and proper nouns), then “Retrieved from” followed by web address. Do not include retrieval date unless the source material may change over time. Provide the Digital Object Identifier (DOI), if one has been assigned to the content, in this format: “doi:xxxxxxx.” When a DOI is used, no further retrieval information is needed. Do not insert a final period following the URL or DOI.

Niska, H. (2005). Testing community interpreters: A theory, a model and a plea for research. Available at: http://lisa.tolk.su.se/00TEST.HTM

  • Unpublished report/ dissertation: Unpublished dissertations, reports and papers can be cited as long as full details are provided. Authors should provide (in this order) – name of author(s), initials, year of publication (in brackets), title of paper (in lower case except for initial letter of first word, initial of first word after a colon, and proper nouns), then title of the report/dissertation (italicised) , name and place of organization/university. For example:

Banna, K. (2004). Codeswitching in Auslan/English interpreters (Unpublished report): Macquarie University, Sydney.

Rosenstock, R. (2004). An investigation of International Sign: Analyzing structure and comprehension. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C.

Submission checklist

7. Submission checklist

Check that the manuscript submission is ready to be considered by this journal by checking off the following:

  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in Microsoft Word document file format, using the IJIE Manuscript Submission Template.
  • Research Articles are no longer than 6,000 words in length, and Commentary or Open Forum manuscripts are no longer than 3,000 words in length.
  • Authors of reviews (of books, curriculum or resources) for the Commentary section should check the ‘Reviewer Guidelines’ HERE.
  • The cover page includes all the required accompanying information as outlined in the Notes for Authors (section 5-5).
  • Where available, URLs or DOIs for the references have been provided.
  • The text is 1.5 line-spaced; uses a 10-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Notes for Authors (section 6) and/or outlined in the Publications Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition.
  • The instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.