The International Journal of Interpreter Education

Welcome to the International Journal of Interpreter Education (IJIE.)  

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About the IJIE

Description

The International Journal of Interpreter Education (IJIE) is a pioneering journal covering topics of interest to all those researching and working in interpreter education. The Editors welcome material on any aspect of interpreter education theory, policy, application or practice that will advance thinking in the field. IJIE addresses issues of current and future concern to interpreter educators, encouraging interdisciplinary discussion.

Co-Editors

Ineke Crezee and George Major, Auckland University of Technology

Publication Info

Publication Information

The first issue of the the International Journal of Interpreter Education was published in November 2009. Two volumes are now produced per year with a rolling call for manuscripts. See Notes for Authors for more information. For more information on subscriptions to IJIE, click here.

If you have any questions, contact the Editor at CITjournaleditor@gmail.com

Context

Context

Research on interpreting has advanced over many years, involving interdisciplinary input from education, linguistics, sociology, and psychology, with studies of the interpreting process, interpreter-mediated discourse, and the role of the interpreter, to name but a few. With increased understanding of interpreting, comes the need to reflect on how we can most effectively educate and train interpreters to function at the highest level to meet the needs of the clients and consumers who rely on their services.

Interpreter education research is an emerging sub-discipline which crosses over adult education, applied linguistics, educational linguistics, and translation studies. Interpreter education can occur in various milieu, including: ad hoc professional development workshops, formal college and university programs, internships; face-to-face or online. Traditionally signed and spoken language interpreters have been trained separately, with little dialogue or information exchange. Since the seminal work of Cynthia Roy (1989, 2000) and Cecilia Wadensjö (1998), however, an understanding has emerged that spoken and signed language interpreters working in the community experience the same challenges in terms of managing their role and mediating communication. Resulting from this understanding, educators and researchers have recognized the value in collaboration across all languages, including spoken and signed languages. Examples can be seen of research projects, education programs and short training courses worldwide, that seek to explore and enhance the skills and knowledge of all interpreters, regardless of the languages that they interpret between.

The Conference of Interpreter Trainers (CIT) was established in 1979, with the goal of enabling information exchange between signed language interpreter educators and trainers in the United States, facilitated through a biennial convention. In more recent times, CIT has opened its proverbial doors to signed language interpreter educators and trainers from other countries, and spoken language interpreter educators and trainers. With Dr Cynthia Roy as Series Editor, Gallaudet University Press has established the Interpreter Education Series, which features contributions from spoken and signed language interpreters alike. The rich discussions that have transpired from the broader membership of CIT, and the publication of the Interpreter Education Series, have been welcomed by all in the field. Thus the need for a scholarly peer-reviewed journal was pressing – hence the establishment of the International Journal of Interpreter Education (IJIE).

Aim and Scope

Aim and Scope

IJIE seeks to achieve a better understanding of the principles that underpin the effective development and delivery of interpreter education. It seeks to understand how policy and practice in the area can be built on sound theoretical or heuristic foundations to achieve a greater impact on educational outcomes and practical application.

Articles based on empirical or action research are welcomed. We also seek submissions which discuss effective teaching practices, and opinion pieces which highlight trends and debates in the interpreter education field.

Sections

IJIE features the following sections:

  • Research Articles
    Theoretical evidence-based articles that present findings from research on, or related to, interpreter education and training .
  • Commentary
    Practice-based presentations of reflections on educational practices and teaching activities that provide meaningful advancements in the processes of preparing future interpreters; maintaining the skills of current interpreters, or promoting the professional development of practicing interpreter educators. In this section we also welcome original reviews of books or curriculae that may be of interest to interpreter educators and trainers.
  • Open Forum
    Publishable interviews with leading scholars, transcripts of debates or presentations of case studies that extend our understanding and analyses of trends in interpreter education and training.
  • Student work section
    Featuring the work of aspiring interpreter education scholars—graduate students who have completed research projects related to interpreter education, who are experienced interpreter educators but may not have the experience of writing for publication—this section specifically encourages interpreter educators who are studying in Masters or PhD programs to share their work with alongside established scholars in the field.
  • Dissertation Abstracts
    Abstracts of Masters or PhD dissertations related to interpreter education.
Content

The content of IJIE will focus on:

Interpreter Education and Training

  • History of the profession
  • World perspectives, philosophies and practices
  • Curriculum
  • Lesson plans and activities
  • Learning environments
  • Student psychological and social factors
  • Testing, assessment and evaluation

Second Language Learning

  • Second language acquisition theory and models
  • Curriculum
  • Language and culture
  • Language activities
  • Team teaching
  • Testing, assessment and evaluation

Interpreting Practice

  • Education to practice gap
  • Internships and mentoring
  • Teaching ethical decision making
  • Testing, assessment and evaluation
Programming and Administration

  • Program administration and institutional issues
  • Program philosophy and design
  • Faculty
  • Accreditation
  • Student entry and exit competencies
  • Language Labs
  • Generalist and specialist education
  • Program Assessment
  • Distance education

Interpreting Research

  • Findings of interpreter research
  • Research frameworks and disciplines
  • Theory to practice
  • Teaching research

Educational Theory

  • Adult education
  • Educational models
Language Policy

Language Policy

The current official language policy of IJIE is as follows:

  • The official languages of the journal are English, American Sign Language (ASL) and British Sign Language (BSL).
  • All journal correspondence takes place in English via email.
  • Correspondence may take place in ASL or BSL via videoconferencing at the discretion of the Editor at an agreed time and by negotiation via email.
  • All manuscripts must be submitted in written English.*
  • All communications about manuscripts will take place in English.
  • Journal information will be made available on the IJIE website in ASL and BSL wherever possible.

*The editors will investigate the future possibility of submission of manuscripts being permitted in a signed language.

Editorial Board
Co-Editors
Ineke Crezee & George Major
Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand 

Sub-editors

Research Article Section
Jemina Napier
Heriot Watt University, Scotland

Commentary Section
Holly Mikkelson
Monterey Institute of International Studies, USA

Open Forum Section
Debra Russell
University of Alberta, Canada

Dissertation Abstracts Section
Carol Patrie
Spectrum Concepts, USA

Student Work Section
Elizabeth Winston
Teaching Interpreter Educators & Mentors (TIEM) Center, USA

CIT board liaison
Kimberly Hale
Conference of Interpreter Trainers, USA

Editorial Board

Amy June Rowley
California State University East Bay, USA

Anna Witter Merithew
University of Northern Colorado DO IT Center, USA

Anna Lena Nilsson
Stockholm University, Sweden

Brenda Nicodemus
Laboratory for Language & Cognitive Neuroscience, USA

Daniel Gile
ESIT Université Paris, France

Helen Slatyer
Macquarie University, Australia

Judith Collins
Durham University, UK

Julie Simon
The Language Door, USA

Karen Bontempo
Macquarie University, Australia

Marty Taylor
Interpreting Consolidated, Canada

Mira Kim
University of New South Wales, Australia

Nigel Howard
Douglas College, Canada

Peter Llewellyn Jones
University of Leeds, UK

Rachel Locker McKee
Victoria University Wellington, New Zealand

Robyn Dean
University of Rochester, USA
Heriot Watt University, Scotland

Board Bios

The Editorial Board Biographical Information

Ineke Crezee
Auckland University of Technology

Bio:

Ineke Crezee has been involved in interpreter education in New Zealand since 1991, when the very first health interpreter course had just been established following a series of medical misadventures.

She published her first two practical guides for health and community interpreters respectively in 1998. Her most recent book Introduction to healthcare was published by John Benjamins in 2013, and she is working on an adaptation of that book for Spanish-speaking U.S. based interpreters together with Holly Mikkelson and Laura Monzon-Storey. Ineke is currently at Seattle Children’s as a Fulbright Scholar, examining the Patient Navigator program there to see what can be learned for New Zealand, collegially supported by Cindy Roat and Sarah Rafton. She is enjoying encounters with interpreters and interpreting service managers in Washington State and learning about the U.S. healthcare system.

George Major
Auckland University of Technology

Bio:

Dr George Major is a lecturer in New Zealand Sign Language/ English interpreting at Auckland University of Technology, and qualified as an interpreter in 2004. George’s main research interests lie in the field of sociolinguistics, particularly in discourse analysis and the development of research based interpreter education resources. She gained her PhD from Macquarie University based on a thesis entitled “Healthcare interpreting as relational practice”, an interactional sociolinguistics study of healthcare interactions involving deaf patients, Auslan/English interpreters and general practitioners. She has published in the areas of interpreter education, signed language linguistics, healthcare and workplace communication, and from 2007-2011 she was the Australasia/Oceania representative on the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters board.

Amy June Rowley
California State University East Bay, USA

Bio:

Amy June Rowley is currently working on her PhD dissertation from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, having completed a Masters in Deaf Education as an ASL specialist, and where she previously coordinated the ASL Studies Program and taught in the ASL and interpreting programs.  Amy June has over 15 years of experience as an educator in the field of American Sign Language.  She currently teaches and directs the ASL Program at California State University East Bay in the San Francisco area.  Her major research interest is ASL Studies and Deaf Culture.  Her wider interests also include program planning and infrastructure, urban education, interpreting and issues of deaf students in mainstreamed or isolated situations.

Specialist areas:

Second language teaching/acquisition, deaf cultural studies

Anna Witter Merithew
University of Northern Colorado DO IT Center, USA

Bio:

Anna has been an interpreter teacher since 1975 and is the Assistant Director for the University of Northern Colorado DO IT Center.  She manages the instructional programs of the Center that are delivered to distance learners throughout the United States, including a certificate program for interpreters working in the American judicial system, a certificate program in Leadership and Supervision of Interpreting Systems and an online baccalaureate program in ASL-English interpreting. Anna is one of the co-founders and past Vice President of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers.  She earned a masters degree from Athabasca University in distance learning and technology.

Specialist areas:

Teaching of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation skills, distance interpreter education, legal interpreting

Anna Lena Nilsson
Stockholm University, Sweden

Bio:

Anna-Lena Nilsson has a PhD in (Swedish) Sign Language from Stockholm University, where she coordinates and teaches in further education courses for Sign Language interpreters, and courses in sign linguistics. Anna-Lena has 28 years experience of signed language interpreting and more than 15 years experience as an interpreter educator. She is also involved in accrediting community interpreters, assisting the public authority that accredits them: Kammarkollegiet (The Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency). Currently community interpreters are accredited in 38 different languages, whereof Swedish Sign Language is one. Her major research interest is currently in discourse structure and reference in sign language, and the implications for teaching interpreters.

Specialist areas:

Accreditation, generalist and specialist education, interpreting research

Annette Miner
Conference of Interpreter Trainers, USA

Bio:

Annette has a Master’s degree in Psychology and an Educational Specialist degree from Western Michigan University.  She has been interpreting for 25 years and teaching interpreting for 15 years in various types of settings.  She taught full time and coordinated the interpreter education program at Salt Lake Community College, taught part time at interpreting programs in San Diego, California, directed and taught courses in an online grant program to deliver education to interpreters working in K-12 settings, and currently mentors working, pre-certified interpreters.  She has served for over 10 years on the Board of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers as President, Regional Representative, and currently, as Director of Research and Publications.  She holds a Certificate of Interpretation and a Certificate of Transliteration from the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf and a Qualified level of certification from the American Sign Language Teachers Association.

Specialist areas:

Educational interpreting, conflict management

 

Brenda Nicodemus
Gallaudet University, USA

Bio:

Brenda Nicodemus is currently a Visiting Professor in the Department of Interpretation at Gallaudet University. From 2007-2011, she worked as a researcher at the Laboratory for Language and Cognitive Neuroscience at San Diego State University. She has been an American Sign Language/English interpreter since 1989 and holds certification with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (USA). She earned her PhD in Educational Linguistics from the University of New Mexico. Brenda has taught interpreting at various postsecondary institutions and has presented nationally and internationally. Her publications include Prosodic Markers and Utterance Boundaries in American Sign Language Interpreting (Gallaudet University Press, 2009) and with co-editor, Laurie Swabey, Advances in Interpreting Research (John Benjamins, 2011).

Specialist areas:

Interpreting research, interpreting practice, second language learning

Carol Patrie
Spectrum Concepts, USA

Bio:

Carol Patrie, PhD, is a national and international expert on interpretation and teaching interpretation. She is Director of Curriculum and Instruction for The Effective Interpreting Professional Education Series TM, Language Matters, Inc. though which she offers credit courses for interpreters throughout the USA.  She is a past president of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers and is a recipient of the Mary Stotler Award. In 1998 she was awarded the Outstanding Graduate Faculty award at Gallaudet University where she was professor and director of the MA in Interpretation. She was one of the founding commissioners on the Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education.  Patrie is the author of the six-volume series, The Effective Interpreting Series and the video series, Interpreting in Medical, Legal, and Insurance Settings, all published by DawnSignPress. Her most recent release is The Effective Interpreting Series: ASL Skills Development. She is currently developing a multi-media package focusing on fingerspelled word recognition and the seventh volume in The EIS, Cognitive Processing in ASL.

Specialist areas:

Fingerspelled word recognition, education for interpreter educators, sequencing within curricular activities

Daniel Gile
ESIT Université Paris, France

Bio:

Daniel Gile is a former technical translator and has been working as an AIIC (International Association of Conference Interpreters) conference interpreter since 1979. His academic training includes mathematics and sociology, and he holds a PhD in Japanese and a PhD in linguistics. He has been training translators and interpreters for 30 years and is currently Professor at ESIT, Paris, where he was trained as a conference interpreter. He has authored, co-authored or co-edited more than 200 papers and 9 books on various aspects of Translation and Interpreting. He is currently president of the European Society for Translation Studies.

Specialist areas:

Translator & interpreter education, cognitive aspects of interpreting, translation Studies epistemology, researcher training

Kimberly Hale
Eastern Kentucky University
Bio:
Kimberly Hale has an EdD in Educational Leadership and Policy studies from Eastern Kentucky University and a MA in linguistics from the University of South Carolina. She is currently an associate professor teaching interpreting and ASL courses in the Department of ASL and Interpreter Education at Eastern Kentucky University.  Kimberly has almost 20 years of professional interpreting experience and over 10 years as an interpreter educator. She holds a Certificate of Interpretation and a Certificate of Transliteration from the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, NAD – IV interpreter certification, and Qualified level of certification from the American Sign Language Teachers Association. Her major research interest is currently in interpreter education within higher education, specifically the fit and success of faculty within the tenure system. She currently serves as the Director of Research and Publications of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers.

Debra Russell
University of Alberta, Canada

Bio:

Debra Russell, PhD, is an interpreter and interpreter educator, and currently holds the David Peikoff Chair of Deaf Studies. As an interpreter educator, she has taught across Canada, and has presented workshops and papers throughout the United States, Europe, Ukraine, Australia, and Southeast Asia. She currently teaches at the University of Alberta, as well as for Lakeland College’s Program of Sign Language Interpreting.  Deb also facilitates on-line courses for Northeastern University in Boston, within the MEd Interpreter Pedagogy program. In addition to her teaching practice, she maintains an active research program, focused on legal and educational settings.

Specialist areas:

Interpreting research and methodology, interpreting in educational settings, interpreting in legal settings

Helen Slatyer
Macquarie University, Australia

Bio:

Helen Slatyer’s professional background is in the fields of translation and interpreting and teaching English as a foreign language working in France and Australia in both these areas. She has been lecturing in the Department of Linguistics since 1998 in bilingualism, community-based interpreting, translation and assessment. Her research interests include discourse-based studies of community interpreting, translation studies, translator and interpreter performance assessment, language assessment and childhood bilingual acquisition. More recently, Helen has undertaken research into curriculum design and evaluation in the context of her PhD on curriculum design for the education of interpreters in languages of limited diffusion.

Specialist areas:

Assessment of interpreters, discourse-based study of interpreters in healthcare, the implications of ethics and setting on role, curriculum design and evaluation

Holly Mikkelson
Monterey Institute of International Studies, USA

Bio:

Holly Mikkelson is Associate Professor of Translation and Interpretation at the Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation, Monterey Institute of International Studies. She is a certified translator (Spanish>English, English>Spanish) with the American Translators Association and a state and federally certified court interpreter who has taught translation and interpreting for over 30 years. She is the author of the Acebo interpreter training manuals as well as numerous articles on translation and interpretation, and is a co-author of Fundamentals of Court Interpretation:  Theory, Policy and Practice. Professor Mikkelson has consulted with many state and private entities on interpreter testing and training, and has presented lectures and workshops to interpreters and related professionals throughout the world.

Specialist areas:

Legal interpreting, translation of spoken languages

Jemina Napier
Heriot-Watt University, Scotland

Bio:

Jemina Napier gained her PhD in Linguistics from Macquarie University in Sydney, where she is now Head of Translation & Interpreting and Director for the Centre of Translation & Interpreting Research in the Department of Linguistics. Jemina has over 20 years experience of interpreting between English and British Sign Language, Australian Sign Language, or International Sign; and is a professionally qualified interpreter in the UK and Australia. Jemina has over 15 years experience as an interpreter educator and has taught interpreters in Australia, Fiji, Kosovo, New Zealand, UK and USA. Her teaching excellence has been recognised through several university and national higher education teaching citations and awards. Her major research interest is in the field of signed language interpreting, but her wider interests include effective translation and interpreting pedagogy, sociolinguistics, and discourse analysis. She is an examiner for the (Australian) National Accreditation Authority for Translators & Interpreters, is former President of the Australian Sign Language Interpreters Association, and has served on the board of the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters.

Specialist areas:

Interpreting/ interpreting pedagogy research, action research, distance education, curriculum development

 

Judith Collins
Durham University, UK

Bio:                 

Judith Collins has been a teacher and researcher at Durham University for many years.  In 1991 she became a member of the team that produced the first British Sign Language/English Dictionary and developed the first MA BSL/English Interpreting. She now teaches undergraduate BSL modules and co-ordinates and contributes to teaching a Postgraduate BSL/English interpreter program which includes both Deaf and hearing students of interpreting. She is Deaf of a Deaf family from Yorkshire, England. Before her academic career began she taught Deaf children. Her research interests include the translation into BSL of assessments for deaf children, and the provision of interpreter services in the UK.

Specialist areas:

Interpreter education & training, second language learning, interpreting research, interpreting practice, educational theory

Julie Simon
The Language Door, USA

Bio:

Julie Simon, PhD, has been an interpreter for over 27 years and an interpreter educator for over 20 years in pre-service and in-service settings.  Her research background relates to language planning and language policy issues in bilingual-multicultural education, first and second language acquisition, and language attitudes as they relate to interpreter education, Deaf education and Native American education.  Her current areas of interest include working with and training trilingual (American Sign Language/English/ Spanish) interpreters and working with and training spoken language interpreters and translators.  In 2007, she opened The Language Door, an education and resource network for practitioners and educators.

Specialist areas:

Second language learning, interpreting research, educational theory, interpreter education and training, interpreting practice

Karen Bontempo
Macquarie University, Australia

Bio:

Karen Bontempo has 20 years experience as an Auslan (Australian Sign Language) / English sign language interpreter, and has worked as an interpreter educator for 13 years. Karen is an examiner for the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters in Australia and is the convener of the NAATI Auslan/English Conference Interpreter accreditation test development team. She recently completed a 7-year term on the national board of the Australian Sign Language Interpreters’ Association and currently chairs their interpreter education committee. Karen is a PhD candidate at Macquarie University, where she is a member of the Sign Language Linguistics Group, the Applied Linguistics and Language in Education Group, and the Centre for Translation and Interpreting Research.

Specialist areas:

Interpreter education and training research, interpreter performance, interpreter aptitude, educational measurement

Marty Taylor
Interpreting Consolidated, Canada

Bio:

Marty M. Taylor is the Director of Interpreting Consolidated, a company formed to provide consultation, evaluation, research, and publishing services to interpreting communities worldwide. She completed her PhD with an emphasis in measurement and assessment. She holds national interpreter certification in both Canada and the United States. Based on research funded by two national Canadian fellowships, Marty has published two books, Interpretation Skills: American Sign Language to English and Interpretation Skills: English to American Sign Language. Most recently, she is researching and writing on projects related to assessment and evaluation, material and curriculum development, distance learning, and VRS interpreter competencies.

Specialist areas:

Distance education, assessment and evaluation, curriculum development

 

Mira Kim
University of New South Wales, Australia

Bio:

Mira Kim, PhD, is an academic and accredited translator with the National Accreditation Authority for Translators & Interpreters. She has worked as a professional translator and interpreter (English/Korean) since 1995. Also she has been teaching a number of translation units, both practical and theoretical, at Macquarie University, Sydney since 2000.  Her research interests include translator education, translation quality assessment, text analysis for translation and interpreting, T&I curriculum development, language teaching for advanced learners, sustainability for education and Korean language typology

Specialist areas:

Korean-English translation, translation & interpreting pedagogy, text analysis for translation & interpreting

Nigel Howard
Douglas College & University of Victoria, Canada

Bio:

Nigel Howard has worked for 13 years as an instructor at Douglas College in the Program of Sign Language Interpretation and Child, Family & Community Studies and as the Continuing Education American Sign Language Coordinator; and over 20 years as a consultant, trainer and presenter. He has over 15 years experience as a Deaf Interpreter in American, British, Japanese Signed Languages and International Sign, with experience of working in medical, legal, community, theatre, and mental health settings. Nigel is a member of the Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada, and the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters.

Specialist areas:

Deaf Interpreter training and development, Professional Interpreter development, Medical and legal Interpreter training and curriculum development, Deafhood presenter.

Peter Llewellyn Jones
University of Leeds, UK

Bio:

With forty years of interpreting and thirty years of teaching experience, Peter is a Senior Teaching Fellow and Program Director at the University of Leeds Centre for Translation Studies, where he heads the postgraduate programs in BSL-English interpreting and teaches interpreting theory to spoken language conference interpreting students. In 1992, he wrote the BA (Hons.) in Interpreting for Wolverhampton University and, in 1997, the Postgraduate Diploma in Interpreting for the University of Central Lancashire (for which he continues to act as Joint Course Leader). Peter was commissioned to write the MA in Interpreting for Leeds University in 2003.

Specialist areas:

Cognitive processes and the development of skills in simultaneous interpreting, interpreting as adaptation/ audience design, the impact of interpreter behaviours/ approaches in community interpreting

Rachel Locker McKee
Victoria University Wellington, New Zealand

Bio:

Rachel Locker McKee is a senior lecturer in Deaf Studies at Victoria University of Wellington, NZ. She holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics from UCLA, and has professional qualifications and experience as a sign language interpreter in NZ and USA.  Rachel has established academic programs in NZ for the training of sign language interpreters, Deaf NZSL teachers, and the learning of NZSL as a foreign language. Her research publications have focused on descriptive and sociolinguistic analysis of NZSL, the practice and impacts of interpreting, deaf children in mainstream classrooms, and the NZ Deaf community.

Specialist areas:

Discourse-based approaches to interpreting research and pedagogy, issues of access to education via interpreting

Robyn Dean
University of Rochester, USA
Heriot Watt University, Scotland

Bio:

Robyn Dean was appointed to the faculty of the University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1999, in recognition of her scholarship in the interpreting field and leadership in the education of interpreters, medical students, and other health care professionals.  She has been an interpreter for 20 years, with particular service experience in healthcare and mental health settings. Robyn holds a BA in American Sign Language Interpreting and an MA in Theology. Robyn’s recent application of demand-control theory to sign language interpreting has been the topic of numerous workshops, publications, and interpreter education grant projects nationally and internationally. Her contribution to interpreter education was recognized in 2008 with the Conference of Interpreter Trainers & Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Mary Stotler Award.

Specialist areas:

Application and evaluation of demand-control schema and observation-supervision, interpreting as a practice profession, occupational stress, teaching ethics and ethical frameworks, evaluation of decision-making

Elizabeth Winston
Teaching Interpreter Educators & Mentors (TIEM) Center, USA

Bio:

Dr. Winston is the Director of the Center for Teaching Interpreting Educators & Mentors (TIEM). She holds a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from Georgetown University, an M.A. in Linguistics with a focus in American Sign Language from Gallaudet University, and an M.Ed. in Technology & Education from Western Governors University.

Specialist areas:

Her areas of expertise include teaching and research in interpreting, ASL discourse analysis, interpreting skills development, educational interpreting, multimedia applications in ASL research and teaching, and teaching at a distance. Dr. Winston teaches courses and workshops in faculty development, linguistics, interpretation, mentoring, and educational interpreting nationally.