The Conference of Interpreter Trainers

2018 BIENNIAL CONFERENCE

Reaching New Heights in Interpreter Education: Mentoring, Teaching & Leadership

Conference Schedule

(Under Construction)

Official Conference Language

American Sign Language is the official language of the conference.
All presentations, unless otherwise noted, will be presented in ASL.

CEUs:

  • CEUs will be offered through RID’s CMP/ACET program.  More information will be coming.

Wednesday, October 31

Wednesday, October 31, 20018

Pre – Conference Event (Additional fee for this event)

7:30 am – 9:00 am

Pre-Conference Registration

8:30 am – 11:30 am

Pre-conference:  Preparing Interpreting Students to Team with Deaf Interpreters

VRSII
Canyon B

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Lunch
12:30 – 3:00 pm Pre Conference (Continued)

 CIT Conference Registration & Opening Ceremonies

12:00 pm – 8:00 pm Registration
Registration Office
7:00 pm – 11:00 pm Opening Ceremonies
Grand Ballroom
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Keynote Address:  MJ Bienvenu
Grand Ballroom
8:30 pm – 11:00 pm Reception with Cash Bar
Grand Ballroom Foyer

Thursday, November 1

Thursday, November 1, 2018

7:30 AM-8:30 AM Continental Breakfast provided Grand Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Conference REGISTRATION Registration Office
8:30 AM-10:00 AM Plenary Presenter Maya DeWit Grand Ballroom A & B
10:00 AM-10:30 AM Break Grand Ballroom Foyer
10:30 AM-12 noon CALI Language Analysis Team Procedure and Findings Cokely, D. , Bienvenu, MJ Alpine West
Service Learning Implementation: Year One Isakson, S. Alpine East
Addressing the “gap”: Bilingualism Upon Entry into an Interpreter Education Program Bowdell, A., Maroney,E. , Behnke, L. Grrand Ballroom A
Deaf Interpreters’ Experiences Calls for Revisiting Interpreting Programs Guardino, D. Grand Ballroom B
12 noon-1:30 PM Lunch provided

Poster Sessions:

  • Jones, ColleenPerception in ASL Interpreted Interactions:  Consumer Orientation
  • Gordon, Patty.  An Interprofessional Simulation with ASL Interpreting and Physician Assistant Students
  • Stewart, Kellie.  To Accept or Decline the Assignment:  Results from an Early Research Study In Sign Language Interpreter Ethical Decision-Making
Grand Ballroom Foyer
1:30 PM-3:00 PM Reaching New Heights Through Collaboration: A Panel Discussion to Share Best Practices Driskill, E., Kurz, K., Shaw, S., Volk, C. Alpine West
Supporting Underrepresented Learners in Specialized Interpreter Education: A 360 Degree Approach Sabatke, B., Jones, L., Oyedele, E., Williamson, A. Alpine East
Reflections from Interns: Understanding Beauty and the Beast Flynn-Dobson, D. Grand Ballroom A
Reaching New Heights: Certification for Interpreter Educators Winston, B. Grant Ballroom B
3:00 PM-3:30 PM Break Grand Ballroom Foyer
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Reaching New Heights in Textbooks Brunson, J. Alpine West
Reducing Your Grading Time:  Student Self-Assessment Practices that Work Fitzmaurice, S. Alpine East
The COMPASS Program Panel: Interpreter Education and Heritage Users of ASL (what we have learned, what we do, and how this might all help you!) Nelson, H., Bishara, S. Marsh, B., Storrer, J, Nash, L., Williamson, A., Kern, K., Kraft, C. Grand Ballroom A
Where in the World are we going as Interpreter Educators? Developing Study Abroad for Cultural Exchange Webb, S., Ehrlich, S., McDougall, D. Grant Ballroom B
5:00 PM-7:00 PM Dinner on Your Own
CIT President’s VIP Reception  – invitees only Hilton Restaurant
7:00 PM-8:30 PM What is the Learning Assistant Model? Transforming Your Course into an LA Supported Course Maffia, D., Listman, J., Kurz, K., Carrillo, M. Grand Ballroom A
Curriculum Standardization and Coordination Holmes, M., Cagle, K. Apline West
What I Wish I would have Known as a New Interpreter Educator Adamiak, A. Apline East
CCIE Forum Canyon Room C

Thursday Workshop Descriptions

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule | Saturday Schedule

Thursday

8:30 AM-10:00 AM

  • DeWit, Maya. Plenary Speaker
    Description coming soon.

10:30 AM-12 noon

  • Cokely, D. , Bienvenu, MJ. CALI Language Analysis Team Procedure and Findings
    Northeastern University’s American Sign Language Program was awarded a U.S. Department of Education RSA grant for $2 million to establish the Center for Atypical Language Interpreting (CALI). The project is intended to address the growing demand for interpreters with specialized skills to serve Deaf and DeafBlind persons with atypical language. The five-year project officially launched on January 3, 2017. During May 2017 over 50 videotaped interviews were conducted by a CDI. Interviews were conducted in metropolitan Boston, New York and San Francisco.

    A language analysis team comprised of MJ Bienvenu, Dennis Cokely, Christopher Kaftan, Daniel Langholtz, and Anna Witter-Merithew worked online and then had a face-to-face meeting to analyze the interviews and create a matrix of indicants and descriptors of atypical language.

    This presentation will describe the work of the language analysis team, show clips of some of the interviews and explain the matrix of indicants and descriptors of atypical language.

  • Isakson, S. Service Learning Implementation: Year One
    Based on the work of Dr. Sherry Shaw, this presentation recounts our experience implementing service learning at a two-year program in a community college. Our program piloted service learning in upper level ASL and interpreting skills courses, resulting in over 650 contact hours with the school for the Deaf and our RID affiliate chapter. In addition, we hosted a symposium with the goal of deepening our commitment to the service learning model, while providing neighboring institutions and prospective Deaf community partners guidance and education for implementation in their area. This presentation will review the institutional assets, program supports, training and classroom resources used, as well as, reflections and lessons learned by faculty in this endeavor. Educators and administrators of IPPs who have considered incorporating service learning will leave with a practical understanding of what it takes to undertake service learning at a programmatic level. 
  • Bowdell, A., Maroney, E. , Behnke, L.  Addressing the “gap”: Bilingualism Upon Entry into an Interpreter Education Program
    Being bilingual is part and parcel to becoming an effective interpreter. To be considered bilingual, one must have Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) in two languages, which is a difficult goal  for students before entering an interpreter education program (IEP). Bilingualism in ASL and English may be difficult to achieve because they differ significantly.  Coursework that utilizes BICS, CALP, and second language acquisition theories can help students achieve bilingualism. Level of fluency in one’s first language will affect the fluency in one’s second language. Assessing fluency in both ASL and English should be an essential part of coursework. Research on language and linguistic offerings at IEPs accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education will be presented. How language courses and assessments can inform instructors and students about the importance of bilingualism before attempting to develop interpreting skills will be explored.
  • Guardino, D. Deaf Interpreters’ Experiences Calls for Revisiting Interpreting Programs
    Attendees will be provided with information from a dissertation study on Deaf Interpreters’ psychological well-being in medical situations with Language and Learning Challenged (LLC) Deaf individuals.  Results of the study indicated concerning stressors, including insufficient training in the Deaf interpreting field, and social justice issues within the medical and interpreting community.  Despite Deaf interpreters experiencing stressors within the interpreting community, team interpreters were an essential support system for them. 

    Attendees can gain a better understanding of issues, for Deaf interpreters and their teams, within training programs and social justice issues in the interpreting community.  Information presented can be used to develop strategies on improving interpreting curriculum and training programs (e.g., mentorship, internship, interdisciplinary curriculum), as well as addressing power differential issues within the interpreting community (i.e., professional development courses) to allow for improved relationships among interpreters.  Addressing these issues would allow for healthier working environment and positive well-being of interpreters.

Noon – 1:30 PM Poster Sessions

  • Jones, ColleenPerception in ASL Interpreted Interactions:  Consumer Orientation
     A survey of non-signing adults showed that a lack of information about the interpreted interaction may lead to feelings of confusion and distraction as well as a negative perception of the Deaf interlocutor.  A review of the literature and of current practice standards revealed that there is very little written on orientation to the interpreted interaction.  This consumer orientation is a dialogue wherein consumers are informed about what to expect during the interpreted interaction, how the interpreter will function, and how they can participate in ensuring that communication is accessible and inclusive.  Recommendations include further research on current practices and the impacts of consumer orientation, opening a dialogue within interpreting Communities of Practice and the interpreter education field, and the development of evidence-based best practices for orienting consumers. 
  • Gordon, Patty.  An Interprofessional Simulation with ASL Interpreting and Physician Assistant Students
    This simulation provides an active interprofessional experience involving students from the physician assistant (PA) and the American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreting programs at St. Catherine University that allows them to practice skill sets and critical thinking necessary for clinical practice and to apply classroom learning in authentic situations.
  • Stewart, Kellie.  To Accept or Decline the Assignment:  Results from an Early Research Study In Sign Language Interpreter Ethical Decision-Making
    When interpreters make the single decision whether to accept or decline an interpreting assignment, the potential for a successful and effective interpreted interaction rests in part on the practitioner’s understanding of ethics, an honest self-assessment of skills, knowledge of the deaf consumer’s language and interpreting needs, etc.; yet, little is understood regarding the ways in which interpreters rationalize and make those decisions. Using a qualitative approach, the purpose of this pilot study was to explore the ways in which interpreters working within for-profit interpreter referral businesses think about and rationalize the decision to accept or decline an interpreting assignment. The findings and implications of this early research project has important implications for practitioners and interpreter educators, as well as, for those who hire interpreters, and for d/Deaf people who are most affected by these decisions.

1:30 PM-3:00 PM

  • Driskill, E., Kurz, K., Shaw, S., Volk, C. Reaching New Heights Through Collaboration: A Panel Discussion to Share Best Practices
    Have you ever wondered how your teaching methodologies compare to other educators?  In the middle of reinventing the wheel, have you ever wondered why you are having to reinvent it in the first place? Collaboration is working with others especially in an intellectual endeavor.  Part of CIT’s mission statement says: “We also seek to advance teaching practices…by providing arenas for the sharing of these ideas”.  Yet, “Over the years there has been much duplication of effort as instructors and programs develop their own materials, curricula, and assessments, without collaboration with other interpreter educators” (Ball, 2013, p.143).  In this workshop, panelists will share their pedagogic strategies in response to submitted questions on instructional strategies of interpreter education (i.e., assessment, teaching, curriculum, etc.).  Be ready to learn practical information and ideas you can incorporate into your courses and curricula immediately.
  • Sabatke, B., Jones, L., Oyedele, E., Williamson, A. Supporting Underrepresented Learners in Specialized Interpreter Education: A 360 Degree Approach
    Historically, people of color and heritage signers have been underrepresented in the field of interpreting and interpreter education. By focusing on creating learner-centered pedagogy for those groups, Project CLIMB, Cultivating Legal Interpreters from Minority Backgrounds, and the CATIE Center’s Behavioral Health Interpreter (BHI) project have consciously and deliberately focused on creating inclusive, empowering, and engaging pedagogical approaches to these underrepresented and undervalued groups. These specialty interpreter training projects have:

    – Created more conscientiously minded learner-centered pedagogy focused on interpreters of color and heritage signers

    – Supported and put forward speakers from underrepresented communities

    -Explored our own cultural competencies, ideologies and implicit biases 

    The challenge and success of this undertaking will be explored in this presentation. From engaging in this presentation, participants will get take-aways and next steps for building more conscientious pedagogy in their own programs. 

  • Flynn-Dobson, D. Reflections from Interns: Understanding Beauty and the Beast
    In the field of interpreter education, there is a limited body of literature regarding stressors that pre, current, and post internship students express and/or experience. The purpose of the workshop is to highlight student’s perceptions of the their internship experience and the stressors associated with that experience, and provide a summary that suggests how Interpreter Training Programs (ITPs) can benefit from this understanding. The workshop presenter will guide participants through a process called Interactive Qualitative Analysis (Northcutt & McCoy, 2004) to understand the unique understanding of the stress phenomena experienced by ITP students. This too will help interpreter trainers see that the student’s perception of stress may vary based on their relation with the internship process, and that students directly enrolled in the internship process may develop complex systems for coping with stress.
  • Winston, B. Reaching New Heights: Certification for Interpreter Educators
    Certification of Interpreter Educators is long past due! We demand certified interpreters and ASL teachers. But, we make no such demands of ourselves. Certifying interpreter educators can provide the community and our institutions with some assurance that interpreter educators have the qualifications needed to prepare students for our very difficult profession. It is time for us to “practice what we preach” and to expect from ourselves what we expect from others – certification of interpreting educators! 

    This presentation intends to 1) share various existing resources (e.g. Effective Practices for Teaching Interpreting: Domains and Competencies 2005) for establishing certification standards for interpreting educators, and 2) explore practical approaches for certifying interpreter educators, such as the recently revised model offered by our esteemed sister organization, ASLTA. Everyone is encouraged to participate and contribute to the development of certification for interpreting educators. 

     Standards Downloadable at http://www.tiem.online.tiemcenter.org/curriculum_domains.html

     ASLTA Process Description available at https://aslta.org/certification/

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

  • Brunson, J. Reaching New Heights in Textbooks
    There has been a long history of teaching interpreting within a professional degree paradigm – focusing on technical skills.  This is traditionally taught at the undergraduate level.  Taking our lead from spoken language interpreters, sign language interpreting scholars have begun to develop graduate programs in the United States and the United Kingdom with a focus on the research and theoretical underpinnings of interpreting – Interpreting Studies (IS).  In an effort to reach new heights in interpreter education, this panel discussion with faculty members from the United States and the United Kingdom, will explore the aim of graduate programs in IS and how that may differ and overlap with graduate and undergraduate trainings in interpreting.  The panelist are renowned scholars for their work in interpreting training, as practitioners, and their contribution to the research of IS.
  • Fitzmaurice, S. Reducing Your Grading Time:  Student Self-Assessment Practices that Work
    In an effort to teach critical thinking skills for students and reduce grading time, our educational interpreting program stopped providing direct feedback on their interpreted work and implemented a self-assessment only system of assessment.  As part of this process students are taught and then graded on the efficacy of their self-assessment of their own interpreting work.  This has fundamentally altered program and course assessments and reduced the amount of time it takes for grading and evaluation.  Findings indicate implementing self-assessments throughout each course, improves students’ actual interpreting performance as evidenced by higher Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA) ratings.  In this session participants will uncover different approaches and tools for self-assessment taking into account instructor time management, as well as, student learning objectives.  Participants will explore what a completely recursive self-assessment curriculum looks like and discuss the strengths and weaknesses therein.  Lastly, participants will formulate if, and how to, implement student self-assessment into their teaching.  
  • Nelson, H., Bishara, S. Marsh, B., Storrer, J, Nash, L., Williamson, A., Kern, K., Kraft, C. The COMPASS Program Panel: Interpreter Education and Heritage Users of ASL (what we have learned, what we do, and how this might all help you!)
    Established in 2016, the COMPASS Program at the VRS Interpreting Institute (VRSII) was designed to support heritage language users of ASL with Deaf-parents as they explore the possibility of becoming professional interpreters. The VRSII recognized a gap that existed in the field of ASL/English interpreter education and since the inception of the COMPASS Program, we continue to address that gap by providing meaningful opportunities designed specifically for heritage language users of ASL. This panel will include members of the COMPASS Program staff who will share more about the program, discuss heritage language research, discuss instructional/assessment/screening examples based on heritage language research, share success stories of COMPASS graduates, and provide an opportunity for ASL/English interpreter educators to ask questions and consider how they can address this gap in their own program and courses.
  • Webb, S., Ehrlich, S., McDougall, D. Where in the World are we going as Interpreter Educators? Developing Study Abroad for Cultural Exchange
    Faculty from three universities (Heriot-Watt University {host}, University of North Florida and Madonna University) worked in collaboration to create extensive mini linguistic/cultural exchanges between American and Scottish Universities.  These exchanges provided collaborative learning experiences for students of interpreting, deaf studies, and sign language instruction, who were either studying British Sign Language or American Sign Language. From this collaborative experience, students were able to increase their exposure to diverse cultures and languages, for which they are expected to engage in on a regular basis. Feedback from participating students demonstrates positive impacts that the cultural/linguistic exchanges had on global awareness, confidence, and in the sign language they are studying.  

    This presentation highlights the benefits and challenges of collaborative study abroad development and implementation; highlighting examples of essential study abroad program components including but not limited to: translingual learning environments, structured learning events, community-focused activities, social development through collaboration, use of instructional technology and social media, engaging the local deaf community, service learning as a framework and reflective practice. 

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

  • Maffia, D., Listman, J., Kurz, K., Carrillo, M. What is the Learning Assistant Model? Transforming Your Course into an LA Supported Course
    The Learning assistant (LA) model is for improving the recruitment and education of STEM teachers. LA are undergraduate students that adopt both roles, teacher’s assistant and tutor. Roles of LA include guiding weekly preparation sessions with students, facilitating discussions in and outside of the classroom, and providing feedback to improve the effectiveness of teaching. Learning assistant model was established in 2003 at the University of Colorado Boulder.  Research has shown dramatic increases in student achievement in LA-supported courses and decreased failure rates. 

    The faculty at NTID have adopted and modified this model for interpreting students.  The workshop will discuss how learning assistances support both ASL and interpreting classes, in addition to data collected on the success of our implementation.  We will provide attendees with ideas on how to incorporate the model in their own programs.

  • Holmes, M., Cagle, K. Curriculum Standardization and Coordination
    According to McDermid (2009), much of interpreter curriculum development is ad hoc. A primary method for disseminating curriculum information from semester to semester and from department to faculty, tenure-track or adjunct, is through a syllabus or a course-shell in the LMS. Using an “Understanding by Design” paradigm, (Wiggins & McTighe, 2002) over the course of two years, the Gallaudet University DoIT coordinated the work of multiple instructors to teach sections of a single course. They developed a single set of lesson plans and instructional materials for each class session, that included student understandings, objectives, assessment evidence and learning activities, which aligned with and elaborated on professional standards and SLOs.  In addition, instructors participated in regular meetings to discuss content and grading practices to ensure standardization. In this presentation we will provide a roadmap for performing this standardization of a course, and engage participants in a discussion of best practices.
  • Adamiak, A. What I Wish I would have Known as a New Interpreter Educator
    In this workshop, a panel of new interpreter educators will compare their personal narratives and elaborate on “what I wish I would have known as a new interpreter educator.” The presenters will share their revelations and realizations of working in institutions. Ideas of how experienced interpreter educators can partner with new interpreter educators to establish mentorships will be shared. New research detailing the top strengths and weaknesses of interpreting instructors, based on data gathered from over 500 student respondents from 40 states in 126 distinct interpreter education programs will be expanded upon (Adamiak, 2018). Applicable leadership traits for new educators and their mentors will be discussed (Daskal, 2017). What do you wish you would have known? Whether you are a new or seasoned interpreter educator, come and join the discussion on becoming and mentoring the educators that will lead us to new heights.  

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule | Saturday Schedule

Friday, November 2

Friday, November 2, 2018

Date Title Presenter(s) Room
7:30 AM-8:30 AM Continental Breakfast provided Grand Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM-5:00 PM Conference REGISTRATION Registration Office
8:30 AM-12:30 PM Business Meeting   Grand Ballroom A & B
12:30 PM-1:30 PM LUNCH provided & 3 Poster Sessions:

  • Sparks, Leia.  The Synergy Experience
  • Miner, Cami.  Interpreting for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Emergent Signers in Academia
  • Delkamiller, Julie. The Impact of Sign Language Interpreter Skill on Education Outcomes in K- 12 settings
Grand Ballroom Foyer
1:30 PM-2.45 PM Plenary Presenter Patrice Creamer Grand Ballroom A & B
2:45 PM-3:30 PM Break Grand Ballroom Foyer
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Boyce Williams:  The Lost Legacy of Interpreters and Interpreter Educators Myers, D., Ball, C. Alpine West
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Deaf Translation: Socio-Cultural Perspective Forestal, E. Alpine East
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Inter-Institutional Collaboration to Achieve Curricular Shift Bates, K., Kurz, K., Storme, S. Grand Ballroom A
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and the Next Generation of Interpreters Wheeler, S. Grand Ballroom B
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Dinner on Your Own
5:00 PM-7:00 PM Seeking New Heights: Leading an Interpreter Education Program to Accreditation with CCIE Roberson, L. Dyce, M, Shaw, S. Canyon Room B
5:00 PM-7:00 PM A Case Study of a Deaf Interpreter Teaching Interpreting Process Courses Tester, C., Olsen, D. Canyon Room A
5:00 PM-7:00 PM Evidence-based Training for Interpreters to Work with Deaf Jurors: Reaching New Heights in Legal Interpreter Education Napier, J. Alpine East
5:00 PM-7:00 PM Reaching Ghanaian Interpreters through Ongoing Short-Term Training Maroney, E., Carpenter, R., Puhlman, B., Fobi, D. Alpine West
7:00 PM-9:00 PM Presenters present for discussion and interaction during this timeframe Grand Ballroom

Friday Afternoon Workshop Descriptions

Friday Evening Workshop Descriptions

Saturday, November 3

Saturday, November 3, 2018

7:30 PM-8:30 PM Continental Breakfast provided Grand Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM-5:00 PM Conference REGISTRATION Registration Office & Topez Volunteer Room
8:30 AM-10:00 AM Deaf Hearing Team: The Hidden Process Brooks, K., Thibodeau, R. Alpine West
Case Study of Sign Language Interpretation Using Visual Teaching Materials (video clips) Kimura, H. Alpine East
Questioning Some Answers and Answering Some Questions: Interpreter Education for Students, Novices, and Specialists Swabey, L., Sabatke, B. Bowen-Bailey, D., Sheneman, N., Laurion, R. Grand Ballroom A
Face to Face vs. Screen to Screen:  Re-Envisioning Online Continuing Professional Development for Interpreters Lee, R., Winson, B., Monikowski, C., Weisman, L. Grand Ballroom B
10:00 AM-10:30 AM Break Grand Ballroom Foyer
10:30 AM- 12 noon CDIs in PreK-12 Classrooms and other Educational Settings Thibodeau, R. Alpine West
Intersectionality, the Latest Buzzword:  What it Means to Teach Power and Privilege in ASL and Interpreter Education Programs Sheneman, N. Robinson, O. Alpine East
Where’s the App for That? An Online Prototype Individual Development Plan Generator for Novice Interpreters Bowen-Bailey, D., Jones, L., Taylor, M. Gordon, P. Canyon B
Interpreting In Educational Settings:  Bridging Research into Effective Mentoring Approaches Russell, D., Williamson, A. Canyon C
12 noon-1:30 PM LUNCH provided & 3 Poster Sessions:

  • Bowen-Bailey, Doug. Good Enough for the Rough Draft:  Using ASL as a Language of Development for Academic Publication.
  • Crume, Peter. Utilizing Hispanic Interpreting Students in Service Learning Opportunities In the Hispanic Community
  • Leahy,  Anne.  Roots of Interpreting with Deaf Parties:  A Common Law Model 1150-1819
Grand Ballroom Foyer
1:30 PM-3:00 PM Certified, connected, and working: What 100 New Graduates Taught us about their Success Nelson, H., Nelson-Julander, A., Covey von Pingel. T Alpine West
7 Habits of Highly Efffective Teachers Featherstone, J. Alpine East
Walk on the Wild Side: Training Trauma-informed Interpreters for Signed and Spoken Languages in the Same Classroom Bancroft, M., Allen, K. Canyon B
Comparing the ASL Competency of Applicants:  Readiness for 4-year ASL English Interpretation Program Entry Garrett, B., Girardin, E. Canyon C
3:00 PM-3:30 PM Break Grand Ballroom Foyer
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Special Interest Group (SIG) Alpine West
Special Interest Group (SIG) Alpine East
Special Interest Group (SIG) Canyon B
Special Interest Group (SIG) Canyon C
5:00 PM-7:00 PM Break
6:45 PM Open Doors Banquet/ Open Cash Bar  Ball Room
7:15 PM-8:00 PM Endnote Speaker Tom Holcomb Ball Room

Saturday Morning Workshop Descriptions

Saturday Afternoon Workshop Descriptions