The Conference of Interpreter Trainers

2018 BIENNIAL CONFERENCE

Reaching New Heights in Interpreter Education: Mentoring, Teaching & Leadership

Conference Schedule

The schedule for the conference is subject to change.

Official Conference Language

American Sign Language is the official language of the conference.
All presentations, unless otherwise noted, will be presented in ASL.

CEUs:

White RID letters on black circle background - with certification maintenance program listed in outer circle.

ASL Communication is an Approved RID CMP Sponsor for Continuing Education Activities. This professional studies program is offered for up to 3.25 RID CEUs (Conference) and .55 CEUs (Pre-conference) at the little/none Content Knowledge Level.

Tentative Schedule

Wednesday, October 31

Wednesday, October 31, 20018

Pre – Conference Event (Additional fee for this event)

7:30 am – 9:00 am

Pre-Conference Registration

8:30 am – 11:30 am

Pre-conference:
Preparing Interpreting Students to Team with Deaf Interpreters

VRSII
Canyon B

Pre-Conference:
2018 GoReact ASL User Conference:
New heights in competency-based interpreter education via interdisciplinary diversity

GoReact
Canyon C

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Lunch
12:30 – 3:00 pm Pre Conference (Continued) Pre Conference (Continued)

 CIT Conference Registration & Opening Ceremonies

12:00 pm – 8:00 pm Registration
Registration Office
7:00 pm – 11:00 pm Opening Ceremonies
Grand Ballroom
7:15 pm Special Announcement
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Keynote Address:  MJ Bienvenu
Grand Ballroom
8:30 pm – 11:00 pm Reception with Cash Bar
Grand Ballroom Foyer

Thursday, November 1

Thursday, November 1, 2018

7:30 AM-8:30 AM Continental Breakfast provided Grand Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Conference REGISTRATION Registration Office
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall Open Canyon B
8:30 AM-10:00 AM Plenary Presenter Maya de Wit Grand Ballroom
10:00 AM-10:30 AM Break (with beverage service) Grand Ballroom Foyer
10:30 AM-12 noon CALI Language Analysis Team Procedure and Findings
(
View video abstract)
Bienvenu, MJ Grand Ballroom
Service Learning Implementation: Year One
(View video abstract)
Isakson, S. Alpine East
Addressing the “gap”: Bilingualism Upon Entry into an Interpreter Education Program
(View video abstract)
Bowdell, A., Maroney,E. , Behnke, L. Alpine West
12 noon-1:30 PM Lunch provided

Poster Sessions:

  • Jones, ColleenPerception in ASL Interpreted Interactions:  Consumer Orientation
  • Gordon, Patty.  An Interprofessional Simulation with ASL Interpreting and Physician Assistant Students
  • Leahy,  Anne.  Roots of Interpreting with Deaf Parties:  A Common Law Model 1150-1819
Grand Ballroom Foyer
1:30 PM-3:00 PM
Where’s the App for That? An Online Prototype Individual Development Plan Generator for Novice Interpreters
(View video abstract)
Bowen-Bailey, D., Jones, L., Taylor, M. Gordon, P. Alpine East
Reflections from Interns: Understanding Beauty and the Beast
(View video abstract)
Flynn-Dobson, D. Alpine West
Reaching New Heights: Certification for Interpreter Educators
(View video abstract)
Winston, B. Grand Ballroom
3:00 PM-3:30 PM Break (with beverage service) Grand Ballroom Foyer
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Reaching New Heights in Graduate Interpreting Education: A Panel Discussion
(View video abstract)
Brunson, J. Alpine West
Reducing Your Grading Time:  Student Self-Assessment Practices that Work
(View video abstract)
Fitzmaurice, S. Alpine East
The COMPASS Program: Interpreter Education and Heritage Users of ASL (what we have learned, what we do, and how this might all help you!)
(View video abstract)
Nelson, H., Bishara, S. Marsh, B., Storrer, J, Nash, L., Williamson, M., Kern, K., Kraft, C. Grand Ballroom
Where in the World are we going as Interpreter Educators? Developing Study Abroad for Cultural Exchange
(View video abstract)
Webb, S., Ehrlich, S., Wessling, D. Canyon C
5:00 PM-7:00 PM Dinner on Your Own
CIT President’s VIP Reception  – invitees only Trophy Restaurant
7:00 PM-8:30 PM What is the Learning Assistant Model? Transforming Your Course into an LA Supported Course
(View video abstract)
Maffia, D., Listman, J., Kurz, K., Carrillo, M. Alpine West
Curriculum Standardization and Coordination
(View video abstract)
Holmes, M., Cagle, K. Ballroom
What I Wish I would have Known as a New Interpreter Educator
(View video abstract)
Adamiak, A., Fisher, C., O’Bleness, A., and Puhlman, B. Apline East
CCIE Forum Canyon Room C

Thursday Workshop Descriptions

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule | Saturday Schedule

Thursday

8:30 AM-10:00 AM

  • de Wit, Maya. Plenary Speaker
    Description coming soon.

10:30 AM-12 noon

  • Cokely, D. , Bienvenu, MJ. CALI Language Analysis Team Procedure and Findings
    Northeastern University’s American Sign Language Program was awarded a U.S. Department of Education RSA grant for $2 million to establish the Center for Atypical Language Interpreting (CALI). The project is intended to address the growing demand for interpreters with specialized skills to serve Deaf and DeafBlind persons with atypical language. The five-year project officially launched on January 3, 2017. During May 2017 over 50 videotaped interviews were conducted by a CDI. Interviews were conducted in metropolitan Boston, New York and San Francisco.

    A language analysis team comprised of MJ Bienvenu, Dennis Cokely, Christopher Kaftan, Daniel Langholtz, and Anna Witter-Merithew worked online and then had a face-to-face meeting to analyze the interviews and create a matrix of indicants and descriptors of atypical language.

    This presentation will describe the work of the language analysis team, show clips of some of the interviews and explain the matrix of indicants and descriptors of atypical language.

  • Isakson, S. Service Learning Implementation: Year One
    This paper recounts our experience implementing service learning at a two-year program in a community college. Our program piloted service learning in upper level American Sign Language and interpreting-skills courses, resulting in over 650 contact hours of service with community partners. In addition, we hosted a symposium with the goal of deepening our commitment to the service learning model, while providing neighboring institutions and prospective Deaf community partners guidance and education for implementation in their area. This paper will review the institutional assets, program supports, training and classroom resources utilized, as well as, reflections and lessons learned by faculty in this endeavor. Educators and administrators of IPPs who have considered incorporating service learning will gain a practical understanding of what it takes to undertake service learning at a programmatic level.
  • Bowdell, A., Maroney, E. , Behnke, L.  Addressing the “gap”: Bilingualism Upon Entry into an Interpreter Education Program
    Being bilingual is part and parcel to becoming an effective interpreter. To be considered bilingual, one must have Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) in two languages, which is a difficult goal for students before entering an interpreter education program (IEP). Bilingualism in ASL and English may be difficult to achieve because they differ significantly. Coursework that utilizes BICS, CALP, and second language acquisition theories can help students achieve bilingualism. Level of fluency in one’s first language will affect the fluency in one’s second language. Assessing fluency in both ASL and English should be an essential part of coursework. Research on language and linguistic offerings at IEPs accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education will be presented. How language courses and assessments can inform instructors and students about the importance of bilingualism before attempting to develop interpreting skills will be explored.

Noon – 1:30 PM Poster Sessions

  • Jones, ColleenPerception in ASL Interpreted Interactions:  Consumer Orientation
     A survey of non-signing adults showed that a lack of information about the interpreted interaction may lead to feelings of confusion and distraction as well as a negative perception of the Deaf interlocutor.  A review of the literature and of current practice standards revealed that there is very little written on orientation to the interpreted interaction.  This consumer orientation is a dialogue wherein consumers are informed about what to expect during the interpreted interaction, how the interpreter will function, and how they can participate in ensuring that communication is accessible and inclusive.  Recommendations include further research on current practices and the impacts of consumer orientation, opening a dialogue within interpreting Communities of Practice and the interpreter education field, and the development of evidence-based best practices for orienting consumers. 
  • Gordon, Patty.  An Interprofessional Simulation with ASL Interpreting and Physician Assistant Students
    This simulation provides an active interprofessional experience involving students from the physician assistant (PA) and the American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreting programs at St. Catherine University that allows them to practice skill sets and critical thinking necessary for clinical practice and to apply classroom learning in authentic situations.
  • Leahy,  Anne.  Roots of Interpreting with Deaf Parties:  A Common Law Model 1150-1819
    The role of interpreter to facilitate participation of a signing deaf party was founded under common law protocols, formed first under British precedents and afterward in the United States. In both jurisdictions, sworn interpreters appeared before Deaf schools, language communities, churches, and lastly signing families appeared. Findings include an 800-year history of signed vows and property transactions; by the 1600s, intermediaries were recognized, and an official interpreter oath published in 1816. As interpreter curricula revise myths of more recent Deaf-World origins with a richly nuanced dual pedigree based also in law, shifts in interpreter positionality and identity are reconciled with a longitudinal view of legal and cultural bases of the profession.

1:30 PM-3:00 PM

  • Flynn-Dobson, D. Reflections from Interns: Understanding Beauty and the Beast
    In the field of interpreter education, there is a limited body of literature regarding stressors that pre, current, and post internship students express and/or experience. The purpose of the workshop is to highlight student’s perceptions of the their internship experience and the stressors associated with that experience, and provide a summary that suggests how Interpreter Training Programs (ITPs) can benefit from this understanding. The workshop presenter will guide participants through a process called Interactive Qualitative Analysis (Northcutt & McCoy, 2004) to understand the unique understanding of the stress phenomena experienced by ITP students. This too will help interpreter trainers see that the student’s perception of stress may vary based on their relation with the internship process, and that students directly enrolled in the internship process may develop complex systems for coping with stress.
  • Winston, B. Reaching New Heights: Certification for Interpreter Educators
    Certification of Interpreter Educators is long past due! We demand certified interpreters and ASL teachers. But, we make no such demands of ourselves. Certifying interpreter educators can provide the community and our institutions with some assurance that interpreter educators have the qualifications needed to prepare students for our very difficult profession. It is time for us to “practice what we preach” and to expect from ourselves what we expect from others – certification of interpreting educators! 

    This presentation intends to 1) share various existing resources (e.g. Effective Practices for Teaching Interpreting: Domains and Competencies 2005) for establishing certification standards for interpreting educators, and 2) explore practical approaches for certifying interpreter educators, such as the recently revised model offered by our esteemed sister organization, ASLTA. Everyone is encouraged to participate and contribute to the development of certification for interpreting educators.

    Standards Downloadable at http://www.tiem.online.tiemcenter.org/curriculum_domains.html
    ASLTA Process Description available at https://aslta.org/certification/

  • Bowen-Bailey, D., Jones, L., Taylor, M. Gordon, P. Where’s the App for That? An Online Prototype Individual Development Plan Generator for Novice Interpreters
    Most students who will enter college in the fall were 7 years old when the original iPhone was announced. These students have grown up in a digital age when there is an app for almost anything. Interpreter education is working to take advantage of digital possibilities. One effort is the development of an online app to create Individual Development Plans for novice interpreters, part of the RSA grant funded Graduation to Certification program at the CATIE Center.  Using the work of Marty Taylor (2017, 2002) and the Entry-to-Practice Competencies (2004) as frameworks, this prototype generates a customized report for interpreters with suggestions for targeted activities available in an online repository.This presentation will report on developing the app for use with interpreting students and novice interpreters, look at the challenges of assessing complex skills, discuss future development, and identify ways that educators can incorporate the app into their own programs.
  •  

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

  • Brunson, J. Reaching New Heights in Graduate Interpreting Education: A Panel Discussion
    There has been a long history of teaching interpreting within a professional degree paradigm – focusing on technical skills.  This is traditionally taught at the undergraduate level.  Taking our lead from spoken language interpreters, sign language interpreting scholars have begun to develop graduate programs in the United States and the United Kingdom with a focus on the research and theoretical underpinnings of interpreting – Interpreting Studies (IS).  In an effort to reach new heights in interpreter education, this panel discussion with faculty members from the United States and the United Kingdom, will explore the aim of graduate programs in IS and how that may differ and overlap with graduate and undergraduate trainings in interpreting.  The panelist are renowned scholars for their work in interpreting training, as practitioners, and their contribution to the research of IS.
  • Fitzmaurice, S. Reducing Your Grading Time:  Student Self-Assessment Practices that Work
    In an effort to teach critical thinking skills for students and reduce grading time, our educational interpreting program stopped providing direct feedback on their interpreted work and implemented a self-assessment only system of assessment.  As part of this process students are taught and then graded on the efficacy of their self-assessment of their own interpreting work.  This has fundamentally altered program and course assessments and reduced the amount of time it takes for grading and evaluation.  Findings indicate implementing self-assessments throughout each course, improves students’ actual interpreting performance as evidenced by higher Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA) ratings.  In this session participants will uncover different approaches and tools for self-assessment taking into account instructor time management, as well as, student learning objectives.  Participants will explore what a completely recursive self-assessment curriculum looks like and discuss the strengths and weaknesses therein.  Lastly, participants will formulate if, and how to, implement student self-assessment into their teaching.  
  • Nelson, H., Bishara, S. Marsh, B., Storrer, J, Nash, L., Williamson, M., Kern, K., Kraft, C. The COMPASS Program: Interpreter Education and Heritage Users of ASL (what we have learned, what we do, and how this might all help you!)
    Established in 2016, the COMPASS Program at the VRS Interpreting Institute (VRSII) was designed to support heritage language users of ASL with Deaf-parents as they explore the possibility of becoming professional interpreters. The VRSII recognized a gap that existed in the field of ASL/English interpreter education and since the inception of the COMPASS Program, we continue to address that gap by providing meaningful opportunities designed specifically for heritage language users of ASL. This panel will include members of the COMPASS Program staff who will share more about the program, discuss heritage language research, discuss instructional/assessment/screening examples based on heritage language research, share success stories of COMPASS graduates, and provide an opportunity for ASL/English interpreter educators to ask questions and consider how they can address this gap in their own program and courses.
  • Webb, S., Ehrlich, S., Wessling, D. Where in the World are we going as Interpreter Educators? Developing Study Abroad for Cultural Exchange
    While study abroad experiences are abundant in higher education, students studying sign language interpreting may find it difficult to pursue study abroad opportunities due to various factors; such as, lack of opportunities available, limited matched program structures, program design, or international partnership as a promoted value of the program and/or higher education institutions’ larger mission. Despite limited opportunity, research shows that there are many benefits to study abroad as they provide opportunities for students to develop personally, professionally, and academically (Dwyer & Peters, 2004). Study abroad is shown to support the advancement of interlingual pragmatics skills in L2 language learners (Barron, 2003). Additionally, the profession of signed language interpreting continues to evolve and sign language interpreters must be increasingly prepared to work in international contexts (de Wit, 2010). Recognizing the considerable benefits to students as a result of study abroad experiences, finding ways to enhance the experience and encourage more educators to engage in international partnerships will be of great benefit to the field of interpreter education.

    Faculty from Heriot-Watt University, in Scotland has collaborated with students and faculty from universities abroad, including the United States and Sweden to create extensive short-term linguistic and cultural exchanges. These exchanges provided cooperative learning experiences for students of interpreting, students from deaf studies, and those who were learning a signed language. From these collaborative experiences, students were able to increase their exposure to diverse cultures and languages. Feedback from participating students highlighted the positive impact that the cultural and linguistic exchanges had on students’ global awareness, confidence, and increased fluency in the primary sign language they are studying.

    This presentation highlights the benefits and challenges of collaborative short-term educational study abroad development and implementation; highlighting examples of essential study abroad program components including: multi-lingual, multi-modal learning environments, structured learning events, community-focused activities, social development through collaboration, use of instructional technology and social media, engaging the local deaf community, and reflective practice.

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

  • Maffia, D., Listman, J., Kurz, K., Carrillo, M. What is the Learning Assistant Model? Transforming Your Course into an LA Supported Course
    The Learning assistant (LA) model is for improving the recruitment and education of STEM teachers. LA are undergraduate students that adopt both roles, teacher’s assistant and tutor. Roles of LA include guiding weekly preparation sessions with students, facilitating discussions in and outside of the classroom, and providing feedback to improve the effectiveness of teaching. Learning assistant model was established in 2003 at the University of Colorado Boulder.  Research has shown dramatic increases in student achievement in LA-supported courses and decreased failure rates. 

    The faculty at NTID have adopted and modified this model for interpreting students.  The workshop will discuss how learning assistances support both ASL and interpreting classes, in addition to data collected on the success of our implementation.  We will provide attendees with ideas on how to incorporate the model in their own programs.

  • Holmes, M., Cagle, K. Curriculum Standardization and Coordination
    According to McDermid (2009), much of interpreter curriculum development is ad hoc. A primary method for disseminating curriculum information from semester to semester and from department to faculty, tenure-track or adjunct, is through a syllabus or a course-shell in the LMS. Using an “Understanding by Design” paradigm, (Wiggins & McTighe, 2002) over the course of two years, the Gallaudet University DoIT coordinated the work of multiple instructors to teach sections of a single course. They developed a single set of lesson plans and instructional materials for each class session, that included student understandings, objectives, assessment evidence and learning activities, which aligned with and elaborated on professional standards and SLOs.  In addition, instructors participated in regular meetings to discuss content and grading practices to ensure standardization. In this presentation we will provide a roadmap for performing this standardization of a course, and engage participants in a discussion of best practices.
  • Adamiak, A., Fisher, C., O’Bleness, A., and Puhlman, B. What I Wish I would have Known as a New Interpreter Educator
    In this interactive session, a panel of new interpreter educators will compare their personal narratives and elaborate on “what I wish I would have known as a new interpreter educator.” The presenters will share their realizations of working in institutions among colleagues and students as well as new research and data-based practices about personal development and leadership. Participants and presenters will brainstorm and share ideas of how experienced interpreter educators and new interpreter educators can partner together to establish mentorships, mutually provide support, and encourage ongoing collaboration. What do you wish you would have known? Whether you are a new or seasoned interpreter educator, come and join the discussion on becoming, mentoring, and supporting the educators that will lead us to new heights.

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule | Saturday Schedule

Friday, November 2

Friday, November 2, 2018

Date Title Presenter(s) Room
7:30 AM-8:30 AM Continental Breakfast provided Grand Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM-5:00 PM Conference REGISTRATION Registration Office
8:00 AM-6:00 PM Exhibit Hall Open Canyon B
8:30 AM-12:30 PM Business Meeting   Grand Ballroom
12:30 PM-1:30 PM LUNCH provided & 3 Poster Sessions:

  • Sparks, Leia.  The Synergy Experience
  • Miner, C.  Interpreting for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Emergent Signers in Academia
  • Delkamiller, J., Cates, D.. The Impact of Sign Language Interpreter Skill on Education Outcomes in K- 12 settings
Grand Ballroom Foyer
1:30 PM-2.45 PM Plenary Presenter Patrice Creamer Grand Ballroom
2:45 PM-3:30 PM Break (with beverage service) Grand Ballroom Foyer
3:30 PM-5:00 PM The Next Generation of Research in Interpreter Education: Pursuing Evidence-based Practices
(View video abstract)
Roy, C., Harrelson, P., Marks, A., Chan Yi-Hin, C., Boeh, K., Bates, K., Rogers, J., Fitzmaurice, S., Winston, B. Grand Ballroom
Deaf Translation: Socio-Cultural Perspective
(View video abstract)
Forestal, E., Cole, J. Alpine East
Inter-Institutional Collaboration to Achieve Curricular Shift
(View video abstract)
Bates, K., Kurz, K., Storme, S. Alpine West
Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and the Next Generation of Interpreters
(View video abstract)
Wheeler, S. Canyon C
5:00 PM- 7:00 PM Dinner on Your Own
7:00 PM-8:30 PM Research Studies in Interpreting and Communication Equity from MAISCE Graduates
(View video abstract)
Alley, E., Brimm, K., Gallon, C., Sullivan, N., Fischbeck, C. Alpine East
A Case Study of a Deaf Interpreter Teaching Interpreting Process Courses
(View video abstract)
Tester, C., Olsen, D. Canyon Room C
Evidence-based Training for Interpreters to Work with Deaf Jurors: Reaching New Heights in Legal Interpreter Education
(View video abstract)
Napier, J. Grand Ballroom
Reaching Ghanaian Interpreters through Ongoing Short-Term Training
(View video abstract)
Maroney, E., Carpenter, R., McIver, S., Alleman, J. Alpine West
8:30 PM-9:30 PM Presenters present for discussion and interaction during this timeframe Grand Ballroom

Friday Workshop Descriptions

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule | Saturday Schedule

Friday

12:30 PM-1:30 PM (Poster Sessions during Lunch)

  • Sparks, Leia.  The Synergy Experience
    Sorenson Communications’ Synergy Program is a partnership with Interpreter Education Programs throughout the United States and Canada. The program creates a more holistic approach for students preparing to enter the field of interpreting. Through partnership, institutions of higher education and Sorenson VRS pool resources to prepare interpreters to work efficiently and synergistically across community, educational and VRS settings. Students are exposed to the VRS setting prior to graduation. The program is customized to fit the needs of participating colleges utilizing resources provided and offering roundtable meetings and virtual gatherings for ITP directors and students.  Using distinct phases, students are supported based on their learning styles. Synergy offers a unique gateway to a multitude of observations that are diverse in culture, language, phone etiquette and teaming opportunities.  Join us and see how your program can participate in the Synergy Experience!
  • Miner, Cami.  Interpreting for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Emergent Signers in Academia
    A significant population of Deaf children born to hearing parents are raised to use lipreading and aids to access spoken English instead of communicating in ASL. If these individuals are exposed to and become late learners of ASL, they are called emergent signers. Emergent signers often use interpreters during their acquisition of ASL, particularly in the post-secondary academic setting. Although interpreters are trained to work along the spectrum of ASL and contact signing by modifying output to provide a comprehensible target language for their clients, emergent signers pose a complex linguistic challenge because of their emerging fluency in ASL. This preliminary mixed methods study investigates preferences of emergent signers when working with interpreters in academia, analyzing and comparing linguistic features of transliteration and ASL interpretation.  Findings have implications for practitioners and interpreter educators, raising awareness and leading to recommendations for best practices when working with this growing population. 
  • Delkamiller, J., Cates, D. The Impact of Sign Language Interpreter Skill on Education Outcomes in K- 12 settings
    There is currently no data addressing the efficacy of deaf/hard of hearing student learning through interpreters at varying levels on the EIPA. The current study uses a quasi-experimental design to test comprehension outcomes for a group of deaf students who attend mock classes in the same core content area. A different interpreter who has scored a 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 respectively on the EIPA will be utilized for each session.  Comprehension of the material taught in each class will be elicited using released standardized test questions from the same grade level and compared across conditions to identify the effects of interpreter skill on student learning. The results of this study will have implications for public policy on interpreter qualifications, as well as for school districts and education agencies who hire educational interpreters. Data collection will begin in May 2018 and preliminary findings will be shared during the poster session.

1:30 PM-2.45 PM

  • Patrice CreamerPlenary Presenter

3:30 PM-5:00 PM

  • Roy, C., Harrelson, P., Marks, A., Chan Yi-Hin, C., Boeh, K., Bates, K., Rogers, J., Fitzmaurice, S., Winston, B.The Next Generation of Research in Interpreter Education: Pursuing Evidence-based Practices
    A new generation of researchers is examining teaching practices and learner experiences integrating evidence-based research practices into education. Paul Harrelson, Annie Marks and Chan Yi-Hin provide a meta-review of evidence-based practices that support role-play activities in interpreter education. Jeremy Rogers, Kimberly Bates, and Kimberly Boeh guide us through explorations of learner experiences: Deaf student interpreters’ experiences in existing interpreting programs; 2) hearing students’ experiences dealing with and managing anxiety and success; and 3) mentees experiences with and valuing of mentoring. Stephen Fitzmaurice shares the success of infusing self-assessment throughout an interpreting program. These presentations share a common theme-the experiences and learning environments of students as they progress toward entry into our field. Each of the authors represents a new group of educators who represent a growing mastery of the set of standards for interpreter educators, including a knowledge of adult education, interpreter education, and research practices.
  • Forestal, E. Deaf Translation: Socio-Cultural Perspective
    There is limited research on Deaf translators and their approaches to translation. New research on Deaf translators will be shared which will support the argument that translation should be viewed through a socio-cultural perspective. Deaf translators provide that perspective through their formative experiences, language and cultural competence to add depth, context, and more meaning to ASL/English translations. There will be opportunities for discussion on teaching approaches using translation based on first-hand accounts from Deaf translators and a collaborative approach working with Deaf and hearing colleagues. The presentation suggests directions in terms of promoting and building a stronger generation of Deaf translators.
  • Bates, K., Kurz, K., Storme, S. Inter-Institutional Collaboration to Achieve Curricular Shift
    As one of the early (1980’s), and leading, programs in interpreter education, Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Overland Park, KS, once again is taking a bold, innovative step in collaborating with The University of Kansas-Edwards Campus (KU-Edwards) to re-envision interpreter education for this next generation. In 2016, JCCC announced their decision to transition from housing a two-year ASL-English interpreter preparation program to a American Sign Language Studies program. Simultaneously, JCCC faculty began collaborative discussions with The University of Kansas-Edwards campus administration, and the Director of KU’s School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. This is an ongoing collaboration which includes curriculum and outreach committees along with administrative support from both institutions. Program proposals are making their way through the appropriate University and Board of Regents channels for approval during the Fall 2018 semester. This paper describes the process of establishing this inter-institutional collaboration and developing undergraduate and graduate level programs which adhere to a language to interpretation model.
  • Wheeler, S. Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and the Next Generation of Interpreters
    This workshop discusses the benefits of teaching emotional intelligence within interpreter education programs. The ability to recognize emotions provide interpreters more context and understanding regarding the human experience to more effectively co-construct a linguistically and culturally equivalent interpretation?  Could understanding emotional intelligence strengthen professional working relationships between interpreters? Can trust and communication between interpreters and the Deaf community could be developed through a working understanding of emotional intelligence?  Expanding on information from her recent dissertation study, this workshop will examine the current state of emotional intelligence with working interpreters. This includes emotional intelligence with your inner narratives, while working with colleagues, interpreting teams, DI/CDI’s, the Deaf community, other professionals, and strengthening interpreting skills in both language reception and production, as well as with understanding and making more effective decisions with more understanding of underpinnings of social interactions and human emotions.

7:00 PM-8:30 PM

  • Alley, E., Brimm, K., Gallon, C., Sullivan, N., Fischbeck, C. Research Studies in Interpreting and Communication Equity from MAISCE Graduates
    The Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies and Communication Equity (MAISCE) at St. Catherine University explores the linguistic, political and organizational factors that shape communication in society. Students in the MAISCE online program apply this knowledge to the design and implementation of a thesis or action research project focusing on communication equity. In this presentation, methods used to support MA research will be shared. Students in the first MAISCE cohort will share their research experience along with findings from their studies. Carly Fischbeck shares her findings from her study on strategies used by interpreters when working with students who are immigrants or refugees. Cheryl Gallon shares her study of microaggressions experienced by Deaf People of Color when working with interpreters. Nancy Sullivan discusses the results of a discourse analysis of a catholic homily in ASL. Karen Brimm addresses collaboration between interpreters and K-12 educational professionals.
  • Tester, C., Olsen, D. A Case Study of a Deaf Interpreter Teaching Interpreting Process Courses
    In the United States, interpreter education programs have taken on the responsibility as gatekeepers for the interpreting and deaf community (Cokely, 2005, Hunt & Nicodemus, 2014, Webb, 2017). Further, the educational setting, k-12 and post-secondary education, is one of the most common area of work for Sign Language interpreters (Marschark et al, 2005). Schick et al (1999)’s research shown that more than half of their interpreters in the study did not perform at the minimum expected in educational setting (cited in Marschark et al, 2005). Part of our responsibility as educator is to ensure that our interpreting students are prepared to work after they graduate and actually represent a cross section of deaf individuals. One part of a possible solution is by having Deaf interpreters teach interpreting process courses. 

    We will explore the impact of having a Deaf interpreter as instructor for interpreting process courses within an Interpreter Education Program. This seminar will present a small case study based on LaGuardia Community College’s ASL-English Interpreter education program, where there’s 1 Deaf interpreter teaching process course along with 3 other adjunct faculty members who can hear. This case study will include current students and recent graduates who had a Deaf interpreter as one of their instructors. The case study will show that the students had a positive experience and benefited from specific teaching strategies.

  • Napier, J., Russell, D., Hale, S., Spencer, D., San Roque, M. Evidence-based Training for Interpreters to Work with Deaf Jurors: Reaching New Heights in Legal Interpreter Education
    At present the United States is the only country in the world that systematically allows deaf sign language users to perform their civic duty as jurors, but little is known about how interpreters work in this setting. This workshop will provide an overview of key findings of studies that have explored ethnographic observations of an interpreted jury empanelment process in the US (Napier & Russell, submitted), interviews with court judges and deaf people that have served on juries in the US (Hale et al, 2017; Spencer et al, in press), and examination of deaf juror participation in jury deliberations in a mock-trial (Hale et al, 2017). These interdisciplinary studies conducted by signed and spoken language interpreter researchers with law academics, also pave the way for interdisciplinary curriculum development. Recommendations will be made for evidence-based best practice in training of legal interpreters to work with deaf jurors. 
  • Maroney, E., Carpenter, R., McIver, S., Alleman, J. Reaching Ghanaian Interpreters through Ongoing Short-Term Training
    In this presentation, the presenters will explain a project that explores collaboration between and among interpreters and interpreter educators from Ghana, the United States, and the United Kingdom. They will describe the context, address the learning objectives of a short-term professional development program, expand on how a western teaching approach is co-constructed and modified to align with Ghanaian cultural expectations and norms. In addition, they will share their stories of working and playing together.

8:30 PM-9:30 PM

  • Presenters present for discussion and interaction during this timeframe

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule Saturday Schedule

Saturday, November 3

Saturday, November 3, 2018

7:30 PM-8:30 PM Continental Breakfast provided Grand Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM-5:00 PM Conference REGISTRATION Registration Office & Topez Volunteer Room
8:00 AM-12:00 PM Exhibit Hall Open Canyon B
8:30 AM-10:00 AM Reaching New Heights in Textbooks
(View video abstract)
Roy C., Brunson J. & Stone, C. Alpine West
Case Study of Sign Language Interpretation Using Visual Teaching Materials (video clips)
(View video abstract)
Kimura, H., Miyazawa, N. Canyon C
Questioning Some Answers and Answering Some Questions: Interpreter Education for Students, Novices, and Specialists
(View video abstract)
Swabey, L., Sabatke, B., Jones, L., Bowen-Bailey, D., Sheneman, N., Laurion, R. Grand Ballroom
Face to Face vs. Screen to Screen:  Re-Envisioning Online Continuing Professional Development for Interpreters
(
View video abstract)
Lee, R., Winston, B., Monikowski, C., Weisman, L. Alpine East
10:00 AM-10:30 AM Break Grand Ballroom Foyer
10:30 AM- 12 noon Model Driven Pedagogy: Teaching and Testing Pragmatics
(View video abstract)
McDermid, C. Alpine East
Intersectionality, the Latest Buzzword:  What it Means to Teach Power and Privilege in ASL and Interpreter Education Programs
(View video abstract)
Sheneman, N. Robinson, O.,
Collins, P.,
Shaw, R.,
Wheeler, S., Bryant, R.
Hill, T.,
Webb, J.
Grand Ballroom
 Storytelling: Sharing a Culture, Keeping Traditions, Learning a Language
(View video abstract)
Popoff, B. Alpine West
12 noon-1:30 PM LUNCH provided & 3 Poster Sessions:

  • Bowen-Bailey, D., Galloway, J. Gibbons, J.  Good Enough for the Rough Draft:  Using ASL as a Language of Development for Academic Publication.
  • Crume, Peter. Utilizing Hispanic Interpreting Students in Service Learning Opportunities In the Hispanic Community
  • Stewart, Kellie.  To Accept or Decline the Assignment:  Results from an Early Research Study In Sign Language Interpreter Ethical Decision-Making
Grand Ballroom Foyer
1:30 PM-3:00 PM
Educational Interpreting in K-12 settings: Use the Clerc Center Online Resources!
(View video abstract)
Lightfoot, M Canyon C
Walk on the Wild Side: Training Trauma-informed Interpreters for Signed and Spoken Languages in the Same Classroom Bancroft, M., Allen, K. Alpine West
Comparing the ASL Competency of Applicants:  Readiness for 4-year ASL English Interpretation Program Entry
(View video abstract)
Garrett, B., Girardin, E. Alpine East
3:00 PM-3:30 PM Break Grand Ballroom Foyer
3:30 PM-5:00 PM Special Interest Group (SIG) Alpine West
Special Interest Group (SIG) Alpine East
Special Interest Group (SIG) Canyon B
Special Interest Group (SIG) Canyon C
5:00 PM-7:00 PM Break
6:45 PM Open Doors Banquet/ Open Cash Bar  Ball Room
7:15 PM-8:00 PM Endnote Speaker Tom Holcomb Ball Room

Saturday Workshop Descriptions

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule | Saturday Schedule

Saturday

8:30 AM-10:00 AM

  • Roy C., Brunson J., Stone, C. Reaching New Heights in Textbooks
    As BA and MA interpreting programs have proliferated, educators continually bemoan the lack of academic textbooks. We introduce our new textbook: The Academic Foundations of Interpreting Studies: An Introduction to Its Theories. This book, ideally for undergraduates at the junior or senior level, or first year graduate students, familiarizes students with six academic disciplines that inform our understanding of the interpreting process and form a foundation for the emerging discipline, Interpreting Studies (IS). We discuss the disciplines: history, translation, linguistics, sociology, social psychology, and cognitive psychology, along with their major ideas, major scholars, and ways of viewing human interaction. In our presentation, we will preview each chapter with power-point slides, discuss the contents and possible use of this textbook, and then open the floor for discussion. We anticipate that educators will have informed feedback, and that it will pave the way for reaching newer heights in Interpreter Education.
  • Kimura, H., Miyazawa, N. Case Study of Sign Language Interpretation Using Visual Teaching Materials (Japanese Sign Language with interpretation)
    We are conducting case studies using visual teaching materials in a class of sign language interpretation. Some drama scenarios were created based on several real interpreting situations that we collected from Japanese sign language interpreters and users.?The video clips were filmed on campus. The behavior and atmosphere of the characters of the dramas were captured close to reality. It was possible to reduce the variation of the images when compared to the examples provided by writing. In the lesson, after viewing the video clips, students exchanged opinions on the behavior of the interpreter. In the future, we would like to invite Deaf participants to join in the case studies. We would like to study the differences in the perception of Deaf people and hearing people, looking at the same interpreting situation.
  • Swabey, L., Sabatke, B. Bowen-Bailey, D., Sheneman, N., Laurion, R. Questioning Some Answers and Answering Some Questions: Interpreter Education for Students, Novices, and Specialists
    Are we asking the right questions about interpreter education? Do we continue to use and promote educational practices as effective even in the face of evidence that indicates otherwise? We invite you to consider these questions as you learn about the curriculum and resources developed by the CATIE Center’s two new RSA grant funded programs. Highlights from the Graduation to Certification program include: results of a national survey of IEP students and recent graduates, pre/post program assessments, an app for individual development planning, an online repository of learning activities, mentor and ASL coach training, a supervised interpreting guidebook, and a pilot for Deaf interpreters seeking certification. Highlights from the Behavioral Health Interpreting program include support toward earning the QMHI credential, introductory webshops, and online modules. Participants will engage in discussions and have the opportunity to ask questions about applying these ideas and online resources.
  • Lee, R., Winston, B., Monikowski, C., Weisman, L. Face to Face vs. Screen to Screen:  Re-Envisioning Online Continuing Professional Development for Interpreters
    If interpreting and interpreting education are to reach new heights, as the conference theme encourages us to do, we need to thoroughly examine the underlying beliefs that have shaped Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in its current form in the US. This panel, composed of experienced interpreters, educators, and online facilitators, analyzes the approaches to and rhetoric surrounding, current CPD practices. Current rhetoric often frames online learning as inherently passive, less effective and non-interactive, while characterizing face-to-face activities as superior, seemingly equating physical presence with “learning.” This mindset values bodies-in-seats over minds-in-gear. Shifting the prevailing paradigm, and identifying effective approaches for online CPD can inform approaches to not only ongoing CPD, but even more importantly, but to how these values can and should be instilled in students of interpreting from their first exposure to our profession.

10:30 AM- 12 Noon

  • McDermid, C. Model Driven Pedagogy: Teaching and Testing Pragmatics
    Various models of the interpreting process have been proposed and it has been argued that education programs adopt one for teaching and assessment purposes (Cokely, 1992). This paper will review a framework for pedagogy designed around a model consisting of two levels of meaning; the literal and dynamically equivalent, where the latter will be further operationally defined as enriched and implicature. Reference will be made to the research from linguistics (Grice, 1975; Sperber & Wilson, 1995) as well as translation and interpretation studies (Blum-Kulka, 2000; Klaudy, 1998; Nida, 1964). Having selected a model, the sequencing of lessons will be examined, as will strategies for assessing student interpreters’ work. The concept of “literal” or “dynamically equivalent” target texts and “breaking from form” will be operationally defined.
  • Sheneman, N., Robinson, O., Collins, P., Shaw, R., Wheeler, S., Bryant, R., Hill, T., Webb, J. Intersectionality, the Latest Buzzword:  What it Means to Teach Power and Privilege in ASL and Interpreter Education Programs
    Diversity, representation, intersectionality, and justice have become buzzwords in higher education. In the meantime, many recognize the benefits of inclusive pedagogies and the need to evolve to meet the demands of an increasingly diverse world. What does it mean to incorporate such ideas in ASL and interpreter education? How do we navigate issues of power and privilege? Or rather, why should we?  This panel explores those terms and discuss what it means to teach power and privilege as interpreter educators. Our panel also explores a variety of tools and strategies in navigating those difficult conversations. Many of our students are taught to interact with deaf people and may work with deaf people as interpreters or service professionals, and work with an increasingly diverse workforce.  As such, it is critical we effectively teach our students how to navigate their power, privilege, and positionality among the spaces they inhabit.
  • Popoff, B. Storytelling: Sharing a Culture, Keeping Traditions, Learning a Language
    Storytelling is an integral part of our heritage. For many, storytelling is how we are first exposed to language and culture. These stories, and the act of storytelling help us frame our identity.

    The use of storytelling as a teaching tool is a fun way to engage students in ASL language development while sharing a valued piece of Deaf culture. In guiding students and mentees through the components of effective storytelling, we share the application of linguistic components such as meaning, cohesion, language markers and affect. Likewise, through incorporating plot, character development, and emotion, students gain insight to native-like cues and back-channeling techniques required for effective interpreting.

12 Noon-1:30 PM (Poster Sessions during lunch)

  • Bowen-Bailey, D. Galloway, J, Gibbons, J.. Good Enough for the Rough Draft:  Using ASL as a Language of Development for Academic Publication.
    As graduate students, “good enough” has been the standard for using ASL in our projects. We have developed drafts of papers in English because revision is easier in  a written rather than a video form of language. With the reality of deadlines, the ASL version is often done on the final day and does not receive a comparable amount of attention to English.

    For one graduate course, we decided to use ASL for developing the rough draft. Our goals were to support an equitable status for ASL within academia and to analyze an issue through a visual language and the cultural perspectives that accompany it. 

    Our poster discussion will discuss our experiences with this process, explore the challenges we faced, look at potential protocols for ASL publication, and suggest possible methods for interpreter educators to foster equity between ASL and English.

  • Crume, Peter. Utilizing Hispanic Interpreting Students in Service Learning Opportunities In the Hispanic Community
    Service learning has been recognized as an effective pedagogical approach of providing students with an authentic learning experience that complements their learning in the classroom (Moreno & MacGregor-Mendoza, 2016). Previous studies indicate that students in Deaf studies related courses enhanced their language proficiency in American Sign Language (ASL) and increased their appreciation of the deaf community and Deaf culture (Cooper, Cripps, & Reisman, 2013; Shaw & Roberson, 2009). 

    Few studies have examined how students in service learning programs may contribute to deaf community-based agencies and their constituents. Agencies that provide services in the form of home visits, such as with early intervention services for deaf children may often struggle to serve an increasingly diverse population. For example, in the western and southern United States, the Hispanic community has become the largest minority group and many speak Spanish and have limited English proficiency. This presents both challenges and opportunities for interpreting training programs. Many deaf community agencies can struggle to provide services to the Hispanic population because many families speak Spanish primarily in the home (Narr & Kemmery, 2015; Steinberg, Bain, Li, Delgado, & Ruperto, 2003) and there is a great need for individuals who are uniquely qualified to provide the appropriate forms of support. Similarly, an increasing number of students who are Hispanic are enrolling in interpreting training programs and are ideally suited to serve the unique needs of deaf Hispanic individuals and their families. The purpose of this study was to examine the benefits the service learning experiences on the interpreting students, Hispanic families, and the staff of deaf community service agency. 

    The qualitative study was conducted with interpreter training program students who attended a large public university in the western United States. The university partnered with a deaf community service agency who provided early intervention services to Hispanic families with deaf children. There was a total of eight families that participated in the study. A total of 12 Hispanic interpreting students were provided with three reflection prompts about their initial, ongoing, and concluding experiences. Both the Hispanic families and deaf community agency staff were interviewed using a semi-structured interview format. 

    The results indicated that the interpreting students were instrumental in supporting communication between the agency staff and the families, resulting in a greater sharing of information about ways to support the needs of deaf children. Moreover, agency staff revealed the students provided other support in terms of developing games and communication aides to support families and their goals to support their deaf children. Furthermore, students felt a greater sense of agency and a means to provide an authentic level of support in both the deaf and Hispanic community. 

    The study was beneficial in terms of showing how service learning can provide an authentic learning opportunity for students as well provide genuine experiences for students to serve deaf community by promoting understanding in an underserved community. 

  • Stewart, Kellie.  To Accept or Decline the Assignment:  Results from an Early Research Study In Sign Language Interpreter Ethical Decision-Making
    When interpreters make the single decision whether to accept or decline an interpreting assignment, the potential for a successful and effective interpreted interaction rests in part on the practitioner’s understanding of ethics, an honest self-assessment of skills, knowledge of the deaf consumer’s language and interpreting needs, etc.; yet, little is understood regarding the ways in which interpreters rationalize and make those decisions. Using a qualitative approach, the purpose of this pilot study was to explore the ways in which interpreters working within for-profit interpreter referral businesses think about and rationalize the decision to accept or decline an interpreting assignment. The findings and implications of this early research project has important implications for practitioners and interpreter educators, as well as, for those who hire interpreters, and for d/Deaf people who are most affected by these decisions.

1:30 PM-3:00 PM

  • Nelson, H., Nelson-Julander, A., Covey von Pingel. T. Certified, connected, and working: What 100 New Graduates Taught us about their Success
    The School-to-Work (STW) Program at the VRS Interpreting Institute (VRSII) was developed in response to the readiness to work gap in the field of ASL/English interpreting. It was the flagship program at the VRSII for nearly a decade, with 125 graduates completing the program with a high degree of success (measured by certification and employment). In 2017, the VRSII invited all program graduates to participate in a monumental research project. This presentation will share some of these research findings, including focus group data that helped us understand their perceptions about what helped them get certified, what helped them gain employment, what other skills did they develop that were key to their success, and what personal/professional connections made a difference on their journey. The presenters will frame this data in such a way that it can be implemented into two- and four-year interpreting programs.
  • Bancroft, M., Allen, K. Walk on the Wild Side: Training Trauma-informed Interpreters for Signed and Spoken Languages in the Same Classroom (English with interpretation)
    This paper examines the outcomes of a four-day, trauma-informed interpreter training project for victim services interpreting that was delivered to mixed groups of spoken and signed language interpreters in Washington, DC, including Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDIs), between 2015 and 2018. It describes the program’s core elements and examines several challenges faced by trainers of the mixed groups. Because the program focused on interpreting for trauma survivors, this paper explores the potential impact of trauma-related topics on interpreters from many different cultures, value systems and beliefs brought together in a single classroom. It concludes with preliminary recommendations for both trainers of mixed spoken- and signed-language interpreting programs as well as trauma-informed interpreting programs. The observations are those of the authors and are subjective. While no formal research was conducted, they do point to the need for research to guide the education and training of interpreters across spoken and signed languages.
  • Garrett, B., Girardin, E. Comparing the ASL Competency of Applicants:  Readiness for 4-year ASL English Interpretation Program Entry
    Believing that foundational ASL competencies are directly related to student interpreters’ success and certification readiness upon graduation. This study compared the expressive ASL competence of applicants with a two year interpreting degree to applicants with only ASL I-IV coursework. The four-year interpreter education pre-program screening results of 250 applicants, over an eight-year period, are compared, analyzing the expressive ASL competencies of the two groups. The data demonstrates that applicants from two-year interpreting programs and applicants who have only taken ASL I-IV possess similar expressive ASL competence. This study further examines if a two year degree in interpreting transfers into the junior-level of a four-year degree in interpreting. The conclusion of this study supports the call to action that others have stated over the last decade by providing quantifiable evidence for addressing national inefficiencies in interpreter education, that negatively impact both the student interpreters, and the quality of services provided to stakeholders.
  • Lightfoot, M. Educational Interpreting in K-12 settings: Use the Clerc Center Online Resources!
    87.5% of deaf and hard of hearing students are now educated in general education settings. Those who are visual learners in general education classes need qualified interpreters to mediate class and school communication. How do interpreters access information about working with deaf and hard of hearing students? What does it mean to work with students who have cochlear implants? How does the role of the interpreter change when working with students in the K – 12 setting? The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center is a federally funded center that has a host of online learning resources and communities of practice to assist with knowledge building. Become familiar with the resources and discuss application in educating future interpreters and working interpreters who are learning about working in K – 12 settings.

3:30 PM-5:00 PM

  • Special Interest Groups (SIG)

Thursday Schedule | Friday Schedule | Saturday Schedule